Posted on

diet supplements cbd oil

Dietary Supplements and CBD Oil: All You Need to Know from Vitamin A to Zinc

Written by Jason Brett — Edited by on November 18, 2020

Health supplements are becoming increasingly commonplace as average Americans struggle to meet their recommended daily intake of vitamins and minerals. CBD oil is the newest supplement to join the ranks, but how might it interact with your existing regimen? Are there any combinations you should avoid?

Put your mind to rest with this breakdown of everything you need to know about CBD oil and dietary supplements.

Interactions between CBD and Dietary Supplements

Visit any wellness, grocery, or drug store and you’ll find shelves lined with an array of dietary supplements, from Vitamin A to Zinc. According to the research so far, CBD oil doesn’t produce unwanted effects when taken with a majority of these supplements, and may in fact bolster or complement your current supplement regimen.

While the likelihood of having a negative reaction from the combination of CBD oil and dietary supplements is slim, a factor which increases these odds is the parallel function of both substances.

For example, in the case of pharmaceutical interactions, one has to be careful taking CBD oil in conjunction with any medication which lowers blood pressure, as cannabidiol (CBD) is also known to be hypotensive. When CBD oil and blood pressure medication is used together, the patient’s blood pressure may drop too low and side effects are more likely to occur.

With that said, if you begin to feel undesirable side effects after using CBD oil with your existing dietary supplements, you may wish to reduce your dosage, or remove CBD from your regimen.

Iron and CBD Oil

Not only can CBD oil and iron supplements be taken together safely, but CBD oil can actually guard against some of the negative effects that iron can have on the body. If you think you may consume more than the recommended daily amount (RDA) of iron, using CBD oil is a wise choice.

Excess levels of iron within the brain have been linked to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. A study on an animal test group found that the cognitive decline brought on by iron build-up could be reversed through the use of CBD.

If you currently take an iron supplement, CBD oil could be a crucial precautionary and protective addition to your regimen.

Fish Oil/Omega 3 and CBD Oil

Fish oil supplements are traditionally used for their high volume of Omega-3 fatty acids. There are no known interactions between fish oil and CBD oil, but interestingly, the seeds of the hemp plant are naturally high in both Omega-3 and Omega-6, in an ideal ratio of 1:3, respectively.

If you are taking a fish oil supplement and wish to use CBD oil, you may find you can kill two birds with one stone. If you find a CBD product that uses hemp seed oil as its base, which many do, you could potentially phase out your fish oil supplement altogether.

St John’s Wort and CBD Oil

St John’s Wort is the only supplement on our list that has any potential to produce side effects when used with CBD oil.

The reason for this interaction is discussed later in the article (see “Effects of CBD on Dietary Supplements”), and relates to the cumulative sleep-inducing properties of both supplements when used together. If St John’s Wort makes you feel drowsy, combining it with CBD oil may increase this effect. However, if it does not have this effect on you, or if sleep is desired, then the combination is of no concern.

St John’s Wort can also affect your serotonin levels in a similar way to antidepressants. CBD oil also increases the serotonin available to the body, so you are at increased risk of experiencing side effects related to high serotonin levels like nausea and dizziness.

Chondroitin Sulphate/Glucosamine and CBD Oil

Joint health is a growing issue, with many people turning to supplements such as glucosamine or chondroitin sulphate in the hopes of avoiding or reversing the damage. CBD oil can be used alongside either of these supplements without any known interaction. However, you may find CBD oil works well enough on its own to reduce inflammation of the joints, providing the possibility to remove glucosamine or chondroitin sulfate from your dietary supplement regimen.

As an anti-inflammatory, CBD oil can reduce the cause of joint pain at the source. An animal study on the use of CBD for joint pain found that CBD “significantly reduced joint swelling” and that it had “therapeutic potential for relief of arthritis pain-related behaviors and inflammation without evident side-effects.” For more information about CBD oil and joint pain, check out our CBD guide for people with rheumatoid arthritis.

Other Common Dietary Supplements and CBD Oil

Here are a few more popular supplements and their potential interactions with CBD oil.

Popular Supplement Interaction with CBD Oil
Calcium No interaction reported
Echinacea No interaction reported
Ginseng No interaction reported
Ginkgo Biloba CBD may not be metabolized as effectively when taken with ginkgo biloba
Vitamin A No interaction reported
Vitamin B6; B12 No interactions reported
Vitamin C No interactions reported
Vitamin D Vitamin D may not be metabolized as well when taken with CBD oil

The reactions between CBD oil, Ginkgo biloba, and Vitamin D likely have to do with their use of the cytochrome P-450 enzyme system, which is just a fancy name for the enzymes in your liver that help digest toxins and certain medications.

Certain components of Ginkgo biloba have been shown to inhibit this system; cannabidiol (CBD) also inhibits this system. While it’s hard to say what exactly could happen when taking these two supplements together, if you decide to proceed with the combination, do so with caution.

Vitamin D, on the other hand, is metabolized by the P-450 enzyme system. Because CBD oil inhibits this system, the rate and efficacy with which Vitamin D can be broken down and used is decreased. If you currently take a Vitamin D supplement, it may be best to stay away from CBD oil.

Side Effects of CBD and Dietary Supplements

Side effects between CBD oil and dietary supplements are rare. Though, some sources suggest the relaxing qualities of CBD oil, when combined with supplements that have a similar sleep-inducing effect, may produce a strong sedative result.

If you’re thinking about adding CBD oil to your dietary supplement routine to help with insomnia, this cumulative effect could be seen as a positive. However, if sleepiness is not desired, the combination should be avoided.

Some of the most popular dietary supplements that are known to induce sleep are:

  • Calamus
  • California poppy
  • Catnip
  • Hops
  • Jamaican dogwood
  • Kava
  • L-tryptophan
  • Melatonin
  • Sage
  • St. John’s wort
  • Sassafras
  • Skullcap

If you’re currently taking any of the above supplements and are not in need/want of a sleep aid, you should probably avoid taking CBD oil.

How to Take CBD Oil with Dietary Supplements

There are thousands of CBD products available online and in-store, so how do you know where to start? In order to find the safest and most suitable CBD oils, there are a few steps you should follow.

Choose a delivery format

The process of combining CBD oil with your dietary supplements starts with choosing a delivery format. CBD oil comes in a variety of forms, including capsules, edibles, vapes, tinctures, drops, and topicals. Choosing a method that is convenient and effective makes getting your daily dose of CBD a breeze.

Here’s a chart breaking down the different delivery methods so you can decide what’s best for your needs and lifestyle.

Delivery Format Pros Cons Time of Onset Duration of Effects
Edibles and Capsules and Tinctures Convenient; Discreet; Doesn’t harm the lungs; Familiar; Dosage control Slow to take effect 30-60 minutes Edibles/Capsules:4-6 hours; Tinctures/Drops: 2-4 hours
Smokables (E.g. Vapes; flower) Fast acting; Easy to use; Social; Familiar Non-discreet; Smoking/Vaping are illegal in many public settings; Can feel harsh on the lungs Instant 45 minutes-1 hour
Topicals (E.g. Lotions; balms; gels) Can be applied directly to the affected area; Bypasses liver metabolism; Long-lasting; Can be worked into daily hygiene routine Slow to take effect Varies widely due to factors like hair growth and the amount of fatty tissue Typically 5+ hours
Transdermal Patches Longest lasting effects; Bypasses liver metabolism; Steady release of CBD into the bloodstream May take hours to feel effects Varies depending on the amount of fatty tissue and hair on the skin 1-2 days

Do your research

Your CBD oil is only as good as the plant it was extracted from and the subsequent manufacturing process. In order to get a high quality CBD product, ensure that you buy from companies which use sustainably sourced, organically grown hemp, and perform third-party lab testing. This reduces the risk of any unwanted pesticides, herbicides or chemical additives making their way into your CBD oil.

Adjust your dosage

While it can be tempting to start with a large dose, like many other dietary supplements, CBD oil can be wasted in high quantities. Some studies have shown that CBD oil has a level at which its benefits peak, after which they cease to increase with dosage. Instead of paying for stronger CBD oil than you need, start with a lower dosage and increase incrementally until you feel the benefits.

If you’re looking for a starting point, we at CBD Oil Review have tested hundreds of products and come up with the following:

The CBD Oil Review Serving Standard is 25 mg of CBD taken twice daily.

If you’re not feeling the effects you’d like, increase your dosage by 25 mg every 3-4 weeks until you find the benefits you desire.

If you found this article interesting you may also be interested in:

If you want to add CBD oil to your dietary supplement regimen, first learn about the potential interactions and side effects that could occur

Frequently Asked Questions: Cannabidiol (CBD) Use in Dietary Supplements

UPDATED NOVEMBER 2019

What is CBD?

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a compound extracted from hemp or marijuana. The Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 (Farm Bill) excluded hemp and its constituents from the definition of marijuana and removed it from the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). Hemp is a valuable agricultural commodity and contains only trace levels of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the intoxicating compound in marijuana. Hemp has been cultivated throughout human history for many purposes, including food, fiber and oil. Modern science has demonstrated that, in addition to its value as a food and fiber, hemp extracts naturally contain CBD and that CBD may have its own health-promoting benefits. Now, by excluding hemp from the definition of marijuana, hemp with no more than 0.3 percent THC (and its constituents such as CBD) is no longer a controlled substance under the CSA.

What does CBD do?

CBD’s prior status as a Schedule I controlled substance presented significant barriers to clinical research. However, in the past few years, changes to state and federal laws have removed some of the obstacles to conducting research. Scientists and physicians have demonstrated that CBD may have multiple benefits throughout the body. Emerging research shows that CBD interacts with cellular receptors in physiological processes that influence sleep, mood, and appetite without intoxicating effects.

MORE: CRN, thought leader on CBD

Is CBD safe?

CBDsq_0.jpg

Research suggests that CBD can safely be used in dietary supplements. It has been established that CBD contains negligible amounts of THC, the psychoactive component of cannabis, and that it is non-psychoactive and does not cause a “high” in users. Further, CBD does not have the potential for abuse or addiction. The World Health Organization (WHO) Expert Committee on Drug Dependence recommended not scheduling CBD within the International Drug Control Conventions. WHO cited the fact that there are no case reports of CBD abuse or dependence; no public health problems have been associated with CBD use; CBD has been found to be generally well tolerated with a good safety profile; and that there is no evidence that CBD is liable to be abused.1 Furthermore, the U.S. Health and Human Services Department (HHS) conducted a scientific review on CBD and concluded that it does not present a significant risk to the public health. HHS found that there is no evidence for classic drug withdrawal, no evidence that CBD causes physical or psychic dependence and no potential for abuse under the CSA 2 .

After the 2018 Farm Bill, why does FDA maintain CBD is still unlawful?

The Farm Bill removed hemp-derived CBD from Schedule I of the CSA, which means it will not be regulated as a controlled substance by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA). However, the Farm Bill did not affect other agencies with jurisdiction over the substance. FDA explicitly retains jurisdiction to regulate the use of CBD in food, beverages, dietary supplements and other FDA-regulated products. FDA takes the position that CBD may not be sold in the U.S. due to provisions in the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FDCA) related to the use of dietary supplement and food ingredients that have been previously studied as drug ingredients. If a substance has been authorized for investigation as a new drug, “substantial clinical investigations” have started, and the existence of these investigations has been made public before the substance was used in a food or supplement, then the ingredient in question falls outside the definition of a dietary supplement or a food 3 . According to FDA, there is evidence that a CBD ingredient used in a drug product met these criteria prior to CBD ingredients’ use in food or supplements. These exclusionary provisions of the FDCA were designed to help protect drug companies’ investments in research and development, not because of any concerns that ingredients that are studied as drugs are inherently unsafe in dietary supplements. There are currently a number of ingredients that are marketed both as dietary supplements and drugs, with no concerns about their safety profile, such as fish oil products.

Can FDA address the problem?

Yes. The FDCA allows the HHS Secretary to create a regulation permitting the use of an ingredient in food and dietary supplements, despite a determination that it was first subject to clinical drug investigations as described above. This alternative would allow FDA to clearly establish a legal pathway to market for CBD as a food and dietary supplement. FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb raised the possible use of this authority in a December 20, 2018 statement on CBD following the passage of the Farm Bill. Clearly, FDA is open to and exploring this pathway 4 .

Why should FDA permit CBD in food or dietary supplements?
What are the advantages?

Exploring a legal path to market for food, beverages and dietary supplements containing CBD is consistent with FDA’s strong public health goals. Recognizing CBD products as lawful foods, beverages or dietary supplements would allow the agency to impose a reasonable regulatory framework around the processing, manufacturing and marketing of CBD products not intended for use as drugs. It would also permit the agency to enforce existing regulations regarding registration of manufacturing facilities; observance of good manufacturing practice regulations; supply chain security; compliance with food additive and new dietary ingredient provisions for food and dietary supplements; and post-market surveillance of serious adverse events. If FDA fails to act, consumer interest in CBD will continue to grow along with a thriving but plainly unlawful array of CBD products. No one benefits from a “wild west” scenario in which companies willing to risk FDA enforcement distribute these products without appropriate FDA oversight and guidance.

1 WHO Expert Committee on Drug Dependence, fortieth report. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2018 (WHO Technical Report Series, No. 1013). License: CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 IGO.

Exploring a legal path to market for food, beverages and dietary supplements containing CBD is consistent with FDA’s strong public health goals. Recognizing CBD products as lawful foods, beverages or dietary supplements would allow the agency to impose a reasonable regulatory framework around the processing, manufacturing and marketing of CBD products not intended for use as drugs.