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Hemp-derived CBD vs. marijuana-derived CBD: what’s the difference?

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Contents

  1. Resin
  2. Contamination
  3. Isolate vs. full-spectrum CBD
  4. The entourage effect
  5. Which to choose? Experts weigh in

Cannabidiol (CBD) has become an increasingly common fixture in medicine cabinets and on the shelves of local convenience stores and major drugstores. There is growing awareness that not all CBD products are made the same, nor are they even necessarily derived from the same kind of cannabis.

There are two classifications for the cannabis plant that produces CBD: hemp and marijuana.

Hemp-derived CBD is sourced from industrial hemp plants, which are grown primarily for their fiber and seeds. Hemp plants tend to differ from marijuana plants in appearance; they are often skinny and scarce in foliage. Hemp is also differentiated from marijuana by its levels of THC, the cannabinoid that possesses intoxicating properties. Under U.S. law a hemp plant must contain no more than 0.3% THC.

Marijuana-derived CBD is extracted from marijuana plants that have thick, lush foliage and flowers that are generally grown and consumed for their intoxicating properties. The U.S. government defines marijuana plants as those which contain more than 0.3% THC. While most marijuana plants contain THC as the predominant cannabinoid, there are several strains of marijuana that are rich in CBD.

That being said, whether CBD is extracted from hemp or marijuana, it remains identical on a molecular level.

One critical point of difference between hemp-derived CBD and marijuana-derived CBD is the resin content of each plant. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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“The CBD molecule and its associated pharmacology are the same, whether it was extracted from hemp or from marijuana. CBD is CBD, regardless of where it was originally derived from,” explained Jeremy Riggle, Ph.D, chief scientist at Mary’s Medicinals, a medical cannabis company known for its Transdermal Cannabis Patch.

Despite the identical molecular constitution of hemp-derived CBD and marijuana-derived CBD, there are certain factors that differentiate CBD products sourced from the two plants.

Resin

One critical point of difference between hemp-derived CBD and marijuana-derived CBD is the resin content of each plant. Cannabis resin is found within the trichomes of buds and, to a lesser extent, on the leaves.

Marijuana plants usually contain copious amounts of resin, while industrial hemp plants contain significantly less. Following that logic, marijuana offers a more abundant source of CBD than hemp. In order to extract CBD oil from hemp plants, a much larger quantity is needed.

There is an exception to this rule. Some emerging craft hemp varieties possess unusually high concentrations of CBD, such as Cherry Charlotte, Cobbler, and Berry Blossom. These cultivars contain between 12% and 20% CBD content with 0.3% THC or less.

Contamination

Where and how the CBD is sourced has a major effect on contamination levels. A lack of stringent local regulations surrounding the production and refinement of hemp could lead to highly contaminated CBD products.

For instance, in China there are few regulations enforced on the agricultural industry, leading to the production of hemp-derived CBD products that tend to contain high levels of contaminants. Studies show that, due to the country’s mining activities, some regions in China have water and soil that are contaminated with heavy metals.

These contaminants manifest as toxicants within the hemp that can potentially taint CBD oil sourced from these plants. In order to remove the risk of ingesting contaminated CBD, it is safer to consume hemp-derived CBD products that are grown without chemical pesticides and tested by a third party.

Isolate vs. full-spectrum CBD

CBD isolate products are those which contain only the CBD molecule, with no accompanying terpenes, THC, or other cannabinoids. For patients with certain medical conditions, or those wishing to avoid THC, CBD isolates made from hemp may be preferred. The alternative to CBD isolates would be whole-plant or full-spectrum CBD products.

CBD isolate products are those which contain only the CBD molecule, with no accompanying terpenes, THC, or other cannabinoids. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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“Full-spectrum hemp is the extraction of all of the components — cannabinoids, terpenes, flavonoids, etc. — of the hemp plant including low levels of THC,” explained Dr. Chanda Macias, CEO of Women Grow, an organization connecting female professionals in the cannabis industry; and CEO of National Holistic, a healing center based in Washington, D.C.

Marijuana plants, on the other hand, tend to contain a more diverse terpene profile than hemp. CBD products derived from marijuana plants also tend to contain THC levels higher than 0.3%.

“When you extract from marijuana, you get the added benefit of added terpene profiles that you can customize. Terpenes have an important therapeutic value,” said Dr. Herve Damas, a physician specializing in CBD treatment for professional athletes and director of Grassroots Herbals, a producer of CBD products.

The entourage effect

Research indicates that full-spectrum CBD products, whether extracted from hemp or marijuana plants, may offer enhanced therapeutic benefits.

“The entourage effect is essentially the synergy, in terms of outcome, that has been observed when cannabinoids are combined with other minor cannabinoids and terpenes,” Riggle said. “The combined effect is more pronounced in combination than in isolation, helping to prolong or enhance the overall effects.”

Various studies have shown that the entourage effect could help increase the clinical efficacy of CBD. One meta-analysis paper, published in September 2018, demonstrated that epileptic patients responded better to CBD-rich cannabis extracts that were complemented with other cannabinoids and phytonutrients.

indoor cannabis cultivation warehouse

Knowing where and how your CBD is sourced will provide major insight into potential contamination levels. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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indoor cannabis cultivation warehouse

One of the study’s authors, Fabricio Pamplona, Ph.D, observed, “It’s not necessarily always present in every clinical indication, but we observed that the patients reported lower doses with full-spectrum CBD than with pure/isolated CBD.”

Patients taking CBD-rich cannabis extracts also experienced fewer side effects. “It’s a complicated system that is not yet entirely understood, but the current evidence suggests there is definitely an entourage effect when cannabinoids are combined either with other cannabinoids or with terpenes,” Riggle added.

Which to choose? Experts weigh in

One significant consideration which influences consumer choice between hemp or marijuana-based CBD products is the law. Following the passing of the 2018 Farm Bill, industrial hemp was removed from the government’s list of controlled substances. As a result hemp-derived CBD became legal in all fifty states.

In contrast, marijuana-derived CBD products can only be purchased in states where medical or adult-use cannabis has been legalized.

For those who have the freedom to choose the plant source of their CBD, the experts tend to highlight the benefits of choosing whole-plant products when possible.

“I treat patients with both hemp and marijuana CBD products and I couldn’t say one is more effective than the other. I can concur that most of my patients find that having THC, even the 0.3% found in hemp-derived CBD products, more effective than products with 0% THC,” Damas said.

Macias pointed out that there are medical conditions that respond only to CBD with varying levels of THC, while other conditions do not require the use of THC to achieve medicinal effects.

“Full-spectrum hemp can provide an entourage effect. The medicinal benefits of a hemp-derived entourage effect will depend on the medical condition, stage of the condition, patient physiology, and the dose response,” she explained. “I do believe, however, that CBD-rich marijuana extracts offer greater therapeutic value than full-spectrum hemp CBD, as it pertains to specific medical conditions.”

For those who have the freedom to choose the plant source of their CBD, the experts tended to highlight the benefits of choosing whole-plant products when possible. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Experimenting with both hemp-derived and marijuana-derived CBD with varying levels of THC and CBD may be the key to finding the right product for your needs. Ideally, choose an organic product of a low concentration, and incrementally increase your intake or product concentration until you find a level that works for you.

“At this point, what we know about cannabinoid therapy is that it is highly individualistic and depends to a significant extent on the symptoms being treated,” Riggle said. “The clinical data is not there yet to provide a one-size-fits-all answer to this question.”

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How to Make CBD Oil

Many people use CBD oil to reduce inflammation, soothe pain, or improve their body’s response to stress. And it’s super easy to make at home, too. Plus you can use healthy fats and you’ll know exactly what you’re putting into your bottle, avoiding the refined oils and additives that commercial producers sometimes add.

If you’re looking to make cbd oil, you’ll need just two ingredients: hemp and a carrier oil like olive oil. The result is a vibrantly herbaceous infused oil with soothing anti-inflammatory properties.

Homemade CBD Oil in a small glass vial with an eyedropper next to crumbled hemp flower

What is CBD oil?

CBD oil is a non-intoxicating herbal remedy made from hemp flower. It is rich in cannabidiol, a type of compound found in cannabis that has strong anti-inflammatory properties. One of CBD’s benefits is that it conveys the beneficial properties of cannabis without the high since it contains little to no THC.

Many people take CBD to help combat inflammation, anxiety, or restless sleep. Some research suggests it helps protect and support nervous system health (1) and may reduce pain (2), while other research suggests it supports gut health and proper immune system function (3).

To make CBD oil at home, you’ll need to follow a simple two-step process: decarboxylation and infusion. While it sounds complex, decarboxylation is a simple process of precision heating that activates beneficial compounds in cannabis. The second step, infusion, releases those compounds into a carrier oil. Infused oils are easy to take, and oil makes these compounds easier for your body to absorb, too.

Activating the CBD

In order to make CBD oil, you need to extract cannabidiol from hemp first. Further, you need to activate through a process called decarboxylation. The compounds in cannabis plants aren’t active or bioavailable on their own; rather, they’re activated through heat which is why the plant is traditionally smoked.

Rather than smoking, you can activate these compounds through other means of heating. Some people bake hemp flowers in a slow oven for about an hour or use a slow cooker. These methods are inexpensive, but they’re also imprecise and may not activate all the CBD.

To activate CBD efficiently and to get the most from your plant material, you’ll need a precision cooker (also known as a decarboxylator) which can maintain exact temperatures needed for the full activation of CBD and other cannabinoids. With precision heating, decarboxylators extract a higher percentage of beneficial plant compounds than cruder methods and are a worthwhile investment for anyone who takes CBD oil regularly or wants to make a consistently good product.

Where to Find a Decarboxylator. Commercial CBD oil producers use huge decarboxylators capable of activating the cannabinoids in several pounds of cannabis; however, if you’re making it at home, you’ll need a smaller version.

We used the Ardent Flex for making this CBD oil. With multiple settings, you can use it to activate CBD as well as similar compounds. And, you can also use it to make herbal infusions. Save $30 with code NOURISHED.

Suver Haze high cbd hemp flowers in a bowl

What you’ll need to make CBD oil

To make CBD oil you only need two primary ingredients: hemp and a carrier oil. Hemp flowers that are high in CBD will yield the best results, and if you can’t find them locally, you can order them online. After decarboxylating the hemp flowers, you can then use them to make a CBD-infused oil.

High-CBD hemp flower

Depending on their strain, cannabis may contain large or relatively low amounts of CBD. When you make CBD oil, choose a strain with a high CBD content so that you can extract the most beneficial compounds into your homemade oil.

Where to Find High-CBD hemp flower. Since hemp flower is non-intoxicating with negligible to no-detectable THC content, it is legal on a federal level. You may be able to find it locally; however, your best bet is to purchase it online.

Sacred Smoke Herbals sells high-CBD hemp flower that’s organically grown, lab-tested, and available in all 50 states. Use coupon code NOURISHED15 for 15% off.

Finding the right carrier oil

A carrier oil is an oil that you use for herbal infusions. Coconut oil and MCT oil (which is derived from coconut) are popular carrier oils both in commercial and homemade CBD products.

I recommend trying extra virgin olive oil because it has good flavor and high antioxidant levels. Even more, research by ardent shows that olive oil is more successful at extracting the plants’ beneficial compounds.

Making CBD oil at home is easy, and you need only a few ingredients. It's a two-step process that involves heating and then infusion into a carrier oil.