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cbd oil and medications

Cannabis Drug Interactions

  • Drug Interactions (380)
  • Alcohol/Food Interactions (1)

A total of 380 drugs are known to interact with cannabis.

  • 26 major drug interactions
  • 354 moderate drug interactions

View all medications that may interact with cannabis.

Does cannabis interact with my other drugs?

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Most frequently checked interactions

View interaction reports for cannabis and the medicines listed below.

Cannabis alcohol/food interactions

Drug Interaction Classification
These classifications are only a guideline. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific individual is difficult to determine. Always consult your healthcare provider before starting or stopping any medication.
Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No interaction information available.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Some mixtures of medications can lead to serious and even fatal consequences.

Drug Status

Availability Unknown
Pregnancy Category Not classified N
WADA Class Anti-Doping Classification

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380 medications are known to interact with cannabis. Includes amlodipine, gabapentin, lisinopril.

Cannabidiol (CBD)

What is it?

Cannabidiol is a chemical in the Cannabis sativa plant, also known as marijuana or hemp. Over 80 chemicals, known as cannabinoids, have been identified in the Cannabis sativa plant. While delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the major active ingredient in marijuana, cannabidiol is also obtained from hemp, which contains only very small amounts of THC.

The passage of the 2018 Farm Bill made it legal to sell hemp and hemp products in the U.S. But that doesn’t mean that all hemp-derived cannabidiol products are legal. Since cannabidiol has been studied as a new drug, it can’t be legally included in foods or dietary supplements. Also, cannabidiol can’t be included in products marketed with therapeutic claims. Cannabidiol can only be included in “cosmetic” products and only if it contains less than 0.3% THC. But there are still products labeled as dietary supplements on the market that contain cannabidiol. The amount of cannabidiol contained in these products is not always reported accurately on the product label.

Cannabidiol is most commonly used for seizure disorder (epilepsy). It is also used for anxiety, pain, a muscle disorder called dystonia, Parkinson disease, Crohn disease, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

How effective is it?

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate.

The effectiveness ratings for CANNABIDIOL (CBD) are as follows:

Likely effective for.

  • Seizure disorder (epilepsy). A specific cannabidiol product (Epidiolex, GW Pharmaceuticals) has been shown to reduce seizures in adults and children with various conditions that are linked with seizures. This product is a prescription drug for treating seizures caused by Dravet syndrome, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, or tuberous sclerosis complex. It has also been shown to reduce seizures in people with Sturge-Weber syndrome, febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome (FIRES), and specific genetic disorders that cause epileptic encephalopathy. But it’s not approved for treating these other types of seizures. This product is usually taken in combination with conventional anti-seizure medicines. Some cannabidiol products that are made in a lab are also being studied for epilepsy. But research is limited, and none of these products are approved as prescription drugs.

Insufficient evidence to rate effectiveness for.

  • A type of inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn disease). Early research shows that taking cannabidiol does not reduce disease activity in adults with Crohn disease.
  • Diabetes. Early research shows that taking cannabidiol does not improve blood glucose control adults with type 2 diabetes.
  • A movement disorder marked by involuntary muscle contractions (dystonia). It is unclear if cannabidiol is beneficial for dystonia.
  • An inherited condition marked by learning disabilities (fragile- X syndrome). Early research suggests that applying cannabidiol gel might reduce anxiety and improve behavior in children with fragile X syndrome.
  • A condition in which a transplant attacks the body (graft-versus-host disease or GVHD). Graft-versus-host disease is a complication that can occur after a bone marrow transplant. Early research has found that taking cannabidiol daily starting 7 days before bone marrow transplant and continuing for 30 days after transplant can extend the time it takes for a person to develop GVHD.
  • An inherited brain disorder that affects movements, emotions, and thinking (Huntington disease). Early research shows that taking cannabidiol daily does not improve symptoms of Huntington disease.
  • Multiple sclerosis (MS). Early research suggests that using a cannabidiol spray under the tongue might improve pain and muscle tightness in people with MS.
  • Withdrawal from heroin, morphine, and other opioid drugs. Early research shows that taking cannabidiol for 3 days might reduce cravings and anxiety in people with heroin use disorder.
  • Parkinson disease. Early research shows that cannabidiol might reduce anxiety and psychotic symptoms in people with Parkinson disease.
  • Schizophrenia. Early research suggests that taking cannabidiol improves symptoms and wellbeing in people with schizophrenia.
  • Quitting smoking. Early research suggests that inhaling cannabidiol with an inhaler for one week might reduce the number of cigarettes smoked by smokers trying to quit.
  • A type of anxiety marked by fear in some or all social settings (social anxiety disorder). Early research shows that cannabidiol might improve anxiety in people with this disorder. But it’s unclear if it helps reduce anxiety during public speaking.
  • A group of painful conditions that affect the jaw joint and muscle (temporomandibular disorders or TMD). Early research shows that applying an oil containing cannabidiol to the skin might reduce pain in people with TMD.
  • Nerve damage in the hands and feet (peripheral neuropathy).
  • Bipolar disorder.
  • Insomnia.
  • Other conditions.

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of cannabidiol for these uses.

How does it work?

Cannabidiol has effects on the brain. The exact cause for these effects is not clear. However, cannabidiol seems to prevent the breakdown of a chemical in the brain that affects pain, mood, and mental function. Preventing the breakdown of this chemical and increasing its levels in the blood seems to reduce psychotic symptoms associated with conditions such as schizophrenia. Cannabidiol might also block some of the psychoactive effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Also, cannabidiol seems to reduce pain and anxiety.

Are there safety concerns?

When taken by mouth: Cannabidiol is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth or sprayed under the tongue appropriately. Cannabidiol in doses of up to 300 mg daily have been taken by mouth safely for up to 6 months. Higher doses of 1200-1500 mg daily have been taken by mouth safely for up to 4 weeks. A prescription cannabidiol product (Epidiolex) is approved to be taken by mouth in doses of up to 25 mg/kg daily. Cannabidiol sprays that are applied under the tongue have been used in doses of 2.5 mg for up to 2 weeks.

Some reported side effects of cannabidiol include dry mouth, low blood pressure, light headedness, and drowsiness. Signs of liver injury have also been reported in some patients, but this is less common.

When applied to the skin: There isn’t enough reliable information to know if cannabidiol is safe or what the side effects might be.

Special precautions & warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Cannabidiol is POSSIBLY UNSAFE to use if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Cannabidiol products can be contaminated with other ingredients that may be harmful to the fetus or infant. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Children: A prescription cannabidiol product (Epidiolex) is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth in doses up to 25 mg/kg daily. This product is approved for use in certain children 1 year of age and older.

Liver disease: People with liver disease may need to use lower doses of cannabidiol compared to healthy patients.

Parkinson disease: Some early research suggests that taking high doses of cannabidiol might make muscle movement and tremors worse in some people with Parkinson disease.

Are there interactions with medications?

Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Brivaracetam (Briviact) Brivaracetam is changed and broken down by the body. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the body breaks down brivaracetam. This might increase levels of brivaracetam in the body. Carbamazepine (Tegretol) Carbamazepine is changed and broken down by the body. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the body breaks down carbamazepine. This might increase levels of carbamazepine in the body and increase its side effects. Clobazam (Onfi) Clobazam is changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down clobazam. This might increase the effects and side effects of clobazam. Eslicarbazepine (Aptiom) Eslicarbazepine is changed and broken down by the body. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the body breaks down eslicarbazepine. This might increase levels of eslicarbazepine in the body by a small amount. Everolimus (Zostress) Everolimus is changed and broken down by the body. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the body breaks down everolimus. This might increase levels of everolimus in the body. Lithium Taking higher doses of cannabidiol might increase levels of lithium. This can increase the risk of lithium toxicity. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Some medications changed by the liver include chlorzoxazone (Lorzone) and theophylline (Theo-Dur, others). Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Some medications changed by the liver include amitriptyline (Elavil), haloperidol (Haldol), ondansetron (Zofran), propranolol (Inderal), theophylline (Theo-Dur, others), verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, others), and others. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Some medications changed by the liver include theophylline (Theo-Dur, others), omeprazole (Prilosec, Omesec), clozapine (Clozaril, FazaClo), progesterone (Prometrium, others), lansoprazole (Prevacid), flutamide (Eulexin), oxaliplatin (Eloxatin), erlotinib (Tarceva), and caffeine. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2A6 (CYP2A6) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Some medications changed by the liver include nicotine, chlormethiazole (Heminevrin), coumarin, methoxyflurane (Penthrox), halothane (Fluothane), valproic acid (Depacon), disulfiram (Antabuse), and others. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Some medications changed by the liver include ketamine (Ketalar), phenobarbital, orphenadrine (Norflex), secobarbital (Seconal), and dexamethasone (Decadron). Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Some medications changed by the liver include proton pump inhibitors including omeprazole (Prilosec), lansoprazole (Prevacid), and pantoprazole (Protonix); diazepam (Valium); carisoprodol (Soma); nelfinavir (Viracept); and others. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2C8 (CYP2C8) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.
Some medications changed by the liver include amiodarone (Cordarone), carbamazepine (Tegretol), chloroquine (Aralen), diclofenac (Voltaren), paclitaxel (Taxol), repaglinide (Prandin) and others. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Some medications changed by the liver include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), ibuprofen (Motrin), meloxicam (Mobic), piroxicam (Feldene), and celecoxib (Celebrex); amitriptyline (Elavil); warfarin (Coumadin); glipizide (Glucotrol); losartan (Cozaar); and others. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Some medications changed by the liver include amitriptyline (Elavil), codeine, desipramine (Norpramin), flecainide (Tambocor), haloperidol (Haldol), imipramine (Tofranil), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), ondansetron (Zofran), paroxetine (Paxil), risperidone (Risperdal), tramadol (Ultram), venlafaxine (Effexor), and others. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Some medications changed by the liver include alprazolam (Xanax), amlodipine (Norvasc), clarithromycin (Biaxin), cyclosporine (Sandimmune), erythromycin, lovastatin (Mevacor), ketoconazole (Nizoral), itraconazole (Sporanox), fexofenadine (Allegra), triazolam (Halcion), verapamil (Calan, Isoptin) and many others. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 3A5 (CYP3A5) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Some medications changed by the liver include testosterone, progesterone (Endometrin, Prometrium), nifedipine (Adalat CC, Procardia XL), cyclosporine (Sandimmune), and others. Medications changed by the liver (Glucuronidated drugs) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of these medications.
Some of these medications changed by the liver include acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) and oxazepam (Serax), haloperidol (Haldol), lamotrigine (Lamictal), morphine (MS Contin, Roxanol), zidovudine (AZT, Retrovir), and others. Medications that decrease the breakdown of other medications by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) inhibitors) Cannabidiol is broken down by the liver. Some medications might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down cannabidiol. Taking cannabidiol along with these medications might increase the effects and side effects of cannabidiol.
Some medications that might decrease the breakdown cannabidiol in the liver include cimetidine (Tagamet), fluvoxamine (Luvox), omeprazole (Prilosec); ticlopidine (Ticlid), topiramate (Topamax), and others. Medications that decrease the breakdown of other medications in the liver (Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) inhibitors) Cannabidiol is broken down by the liver. Some medications might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down cannabidiol. Taking cannabidiol along with these medications might increase the effects and side effects of cannabidiol.
Some medications that might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down cannabidiol include amiodarone (Cordarone), clarithromycin (Biaxin), diltiazem (Cardizem), erythromycin (E-mycin, Erythrocin), indinavir (Crixivan), ritonavir (Norvir), saquinavir (Fortovase, Invirase), and many others. Medications that increase breakdown of other medications by the liver (Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) inducers) Cannabidiol is broken down by the liver. Some medications might increase how quickly the liver breaks down cannabidiol. Taking cannabidiol along with these medications might decrease the effects of cannabidiol.
Some of these medicines include carbamazepine (Tegretol), phenobarbital, phenytoin (Dilantin), rifampin, rifabutin (Mycobutin), and others. Medications that increase the breakdown of other medications by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) inducers) Cannabidiol is broken down by the liver. Some medications might increase how quickly the liver breaks down cannabidiol. Taking cannabidiol along with these medications might decrease the effects of cannabidiol.
Some medications that might increase the breakdown of cannabidiol in the liver include carbamazepine (Tegretol), prednisone (Deltasone), and rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane). Methadone (Dolophine) Methadone is broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down methadone. Taking cannabidiol along with methadone might increase the effects and side effects of methadone. Rufinamide (Banzel) Rufinamide is changed and broken down by the body. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the body breaks down rufinamide. This might increase levels of rufinamide in the body by a small amount. Sedative medications (CNS depressants) Cannabidiol might cause sleepiness and drowsiness. Medications that cause sleepiness are called sedatives. Taking cannabidiol along with sedative medications might cause too much sleepiness.

Some sedative medications include benzodiazepines, pentobarbital (Nembutal), phenobarbital (Luminal), secobarbital (Seconal), thiopental (Pentothal), fentanyl (Duragesic, Sublimaze), morphine, propofol (Diprivan), and others. Sirolimus (Rapamune) Sirolimus is changed and broken down by the body. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the body breaks down sirolimus. This might increase levels of sirolimus in the body. Stiripentol (Diacomit) Stiripentol is changed and broken down by the body. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the body breaks down stiripentol. This might increase levels of stiripentol in the body and increase its side effects. Tacrolimus (Prograf) Tacrolimus is changed and broken down by the body. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the body breaks down tacrolimus. This might increase levels of tacrolimus in the body. Topiramate (Tompamax) Topiramate is changed and broken down by the body. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the body breaks down topiramate. This might increase levels of topiramate in the body by a small amount. Valproate Valproic acid can cause liver injury. Taking cannabidiol with valproic acid might increase the chance of liver injury. Cannabidiol and/or valproic acid might need to be stopped, or the dose might need to be reduced. Warfarin Cannabidiol might increase levels of warfarin, which can increase the risk for bleeding. Cannabidiol and/or warfarin might need to be stopped, or the dose might need to be reduced. Zonisamide Zonisamide is changed and broken down by the body. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the body breaks down zonisamide. This might increase levels of zonisamide in the body by a small amount.

Cannabidiol is a chemical in the Cannabis sativa plant, also known as marijuana or hemp. One specific form of CBD is approved as a drug in the U.S. for seizure.