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best cbd oil for vape

Best CBD Vape Juice 2021

avida cbd vape juice

Avida CBD vape juice comes in 8 delicious flavors like tangy Berry Grape and creamy Blueberry Cake. Made with CBD isolate for fast-acting effectiveness–without the THC. Available in 250mg, 500mg, 1000mg and 1500mg formulations.

VaporFi CBD Custom Blend

JustCBD E-Liquid

  1. CBD vape
  2. What is CBD vape oil?
  3. Will CBD vape oil get me high?
  4. Benefits of CBD vape juice
  5. How much CBD should I vape?
  6. Vaping CBD for beginners
  7. CBD vaping effects
  8. How to find the best CBD e-liquid

CBD vape

Vapers have been embracing CBD oil lately. There are so many health benefits associated with CBD, especially if you vape it. Even if you don’t have any health issues at all, vaping CBD can still make you feel even better. It’s non-psychoactive, so it will not get you high — but it can help to ease your mind and body.

There is still a lot of confusion regarding CBD oil and vaping. Technically speaking, “CBD vape oil” isn’t actually oil-based. A more accurate term for it would be CBD vape juice, or CBD e-liquid. Unlike CBD oil tinctures, they are designed for vaping.

We have been carefully testing out CBD vape juice over the last few years to find the most dependable brands that you can trust. Here are the best CBD e-liquids available in terms of quality and flavor, based on our testing and research.

Disclaimer: CBD vape juice is designed specifically for vaping and is not the same as oil-based CBD oil tinctures which are NOT suitable for inhalation.

avida cbd vape juice

Avida CBD

Avida CBD offer CBD vape juice flavors that pop. If you enjoy well crafted e-juice that tastes like candy, you’re going to love their flavors. They also offer an unflavored additive to infuse your current favorites with CBD. Avida CBD is available in 250, 500, 1000 and 1500 mg CBD and is made using THC-free CBD isolate.

VaporFi CBD Custom Blend

VaporFi CBD Custom Blend

Imagine you could create your own CBD vape juice flavors? VaporFi lets you utilize their state of the art lab and high quality ingredients to fulfill your fantasy. Combine up to 3 flavors from a plethora of options. Available in 30 mL bottles with 500 mg of CBD, in full spectrum or isolate.

JustCBD E-Liquid

JustCBD E-Liquid

JustCBD offers your favorite vape juice flavors infused with cannabidiol. There are 8 exciting varieties to choose from ranging from ripe fruit to sugar-coated desserts. They feature an 80/20 VG/PG blend and come in 60 mL bottles, in 100 to 1000 mg strengths. All of them have been verified via third-party lab testing.

Blue Moon Hemp

Blue Moon Hemp

Blue Moon Hemp is known for having some of the freshest tasting CBD vape juice. They’re formulated with VG, PG and pure CBD crystaline, so they do not contain THC. Blue Moon Hemp comes in 30 mL bottles and are available in 100, 200, 300, 400 and 1000 mg CBD. Enjoy the purity of CBD extracted from industrial hemp.

CBDistillery CBD e-liquid

CBDistillery E-Liquid

CBDistillery now produces a full line of broad spectrum CBD e-liquid for cartridges and refillable devices. Available in four flavors, in regular 500 mg and extra strength 1000 mg CBD. It contains cannabinoids like CBDv and CBC. Their CBD vape juice is formulated with 85:15 VG/PG, to provide a defined throat hit.

What is CBD vape oil?

CBD vape oil is a term that generally refers to any vape juice that contains CBD, as opposed to nicotine. It is really a misnomer considering that it doesn’t actually contain any oil. It would be more accurately referred to as CBD vape juice or CBD e-liquid. Some are CBD vape additives that mix in with your existing flavors, while others are pre-mixed flavors. CBD is naturally-occurring in cannabis and hemp plants and has been shown to provide relief for a wide range of symptoms.

CBD e-liquid is formulated specifically for vaping, but the ingredients (VG, PG, CBD and flavorings) also happen to be edible, so they can also be taken orally. Keep in mind, it doesn’t work the other way around! CBD oil tinctures and hemp seed oil, are for oral use only because they are both oil-based substances which are not suitable for inhalation.

Will CBD vape oil get me high?

No. Most CBD vape juice is formulated with CBD isolate which contains non-detectable levels of THC. In fact, they rarely contain any other cannabinoids aside from CBD itself. Some CBD vapes, typically full spectrum CBD oil cartridges are derived from raw hemp and contain trace amounts of THC.

In both cases, CBD vapes containing up to the legal limit (0.3%) of THC is still considered to be non-psychoactive, so they will not get you high. If you’re not worried about THC, full spectrum and broad spectrum vapes can provide additional benefits beyond cannabidiol itself. They shouldn’t be confused with THC oil vapes which generally do contain THC which can get you high, unlike

Benefits of CBD vape juice

Health Benefits of Cannabidiol-Infographic

The main benefit of CBD e-liquid is that vaping it has the highest bioavailability compared to all of the other consumption methods. Most people vape CBD for anxiety, while others vape CBD for pain relief. The list goes on, but CBD has been shown potential for helping a variety of symptoms associated with:

  • Seizures
  • Insomnia
  • Neurodegenerative conditions
  • Nausea
  • Acne
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Parkinson’s
  • Alzheimer’s
  • Psychosis

Even if you’ve never tried vaping before, CBD vapes are an enjoyable and highly effective way to get a quick dose of cannabidiol. It’s perfectly legal, as long as it contains below 0.3% THC. In some states a medical prescription is still required.

How much CBD should I vape?

CBD dosage Infographic

There are many personal factors that go into this including your age, weight, tolerance and most importantly your symptoms. Different conditions require different dosages. Taking it for seizures may require a higher dose of CBD than taking it for nausea, for example. Another important question to ask yourself is how often do you vape? If you vape infrequently, go with a higher strength to compensate. Use this chart as a starting point and adjust to your personal needs.

CBD e-liquid strengths:

  • 50 – 200 (Low)
  • 200 – 500 mg (Medium)
  • 500 – 2000 mg (High)
  • 2000 – 4000 mg (Very high)

Keep in mind these CBD strengths reflect the content of the entire bottle of CBD vape juice. Unlike regular e-juice, the concentration of CBD is determined per bottle (not per mL). A 30 mL bottle with a content of 500 mg is a good starting point, but for more demanding conditions 1000 mg + might be more appropriate.

Divide by the bottle size to figure out the mg of CBD per mL, then you can work out how much CBD you should be vaping. Be sure to check out the full guide on finding the right CBD dosage for you, whether you’re vaping it or otherwise.

Vaping CBD for beginners

Vaping CBD vape juice is essentially the same process as vaping non-CBD vape juice. First, make sure you are using a CBD e-liquid, not an oil-based tincture. It’s important to know the difference because they are often sold in are virtually indistinguishable bottles. If you are using a CBD vape additive, be sure to mix it into your e-juice well. Shake it up and allow time for them to blend together.

You will obviously need some type of device for vaping. If you already own a regular vape tank for e-liquid, you can also use it for CBD vape juice. Or you can purchase a separate device for CBD so you can continue using your regular nicotine-based e-liquids. Lower strength CBD e-liquids tend to be best for sub ohm devices, while higher strength ones are better suited for lower powered mouth to lung devices. This is just a general rule of thumb, but to each his own.

CBD vape pens are another way to have a dedicated device for CBD. They come in both disposable, or rechargeable styles that utilize replaceable tanks. Pod vapes have also been increasing in popularity for CBD because they use interchangeable pods, which makes it even easier to swap between CBD and nicotine.

Here are some tips for beginners on how to vape CBD properly:

  • Fill up your device with CBD e-liquid and let it soak into the coil and wick for at least 10 to 15 minutes.
  • Start slow, take a small puff and see how it affects you.
  • Experiment with bigger puffs, keep in mind you don’t need to hold it in for longer than a second, just inhale and exhale naturally.
  • You might notice a slightly earthy or bitter aftertaste. That’s normal with CBD vapes, especially with higher concentrations of cannabidiol.

CBD vaping effects

The most noticeable effects from vaping CBD oil are the calming and euphoric sensation you get from it. If you take the right dosage, it can elevate your mood and reduce anxiety. If you’re in pain, or just stressed out, you can get relief with CBD vape juice. You might not achieve it instantly, but after taking it on a regular basis you will start to notice the effects.

Some of the most commonly reported effects of vaping CBD are:

  • Elevated mood
  • Reduced stress
  • Reduced anxiety
  • Reduced pain
  • Mild euphoria
  • Improved sleep

There are some minor side effects generally associated with CBD, according to a German study conducted in 2017. The most common ones were dry mouth, and tiredness. You will need to vape a lot of CBD before you encounter these effects. If you feel them, take a break and drink some water or just take a short nap. Some people experienced diarrhea, but the study administered CBD orally using a carrier oil, which could have been responsible for causing it.

Just vape less frequently or use a less powerful device. You can cut your CBD vape with some your favorite premium e-liquids, or just purchase a lower strength of CBD e-liquid next time, or use a more appropriate device for your needs.

The most commonly reported side effects were:

  • Diarrhea
  • Dry mouth
  • Tiredness
  • Exhaustion

How to find the best CBD e-liquid

It seems like CBD e-liquid is making an appearance everywhere these days. You probably have already seen it being sold at your local vape shop. With new brands and products coming all the time, it’s hard to know which ones are legit. We’ve been rigorously testing the best CBD e-liquids over the last few years.

If you want the best quality, have a look at some of the suggestions above. No matter where you’re getting it from, make sure you are only purchasing from trusted and reliable sources. There are many other great CBD brands out there but we happened to enjoy these the most for their superior quality and flavor.

In addition, all of the CBD products we select must first go through an independent lab testing process. They check for contaminants and verify CBD and THC levels. There are a lot of brands out there that don’t publish these results and could be using harmful substances or producing under poor conditions. We highly suggest sticking with the CBD e-liquids listed above. Always be cautious!

Remember that if you’re not interested in vaping, you can take still CBD vape juice sublingually. Just put a few drops (20 per mL) under your tongue and let it absorb for 30 seconds. There are also many other easy ways to take CBD including CBD pain creams and CBD capsules. They even make CBD oil for your dog these days!

Everything you need to know about vaping CBD oil and the best brands with the most reliable and effective CBD vape juices based on testing and experience.

What’s the Best CBD Vape Juice in 2021?

Looking for the best CBD vape juices that you can currently get?

You’ve come to the right place.

We reviewed 27 samples by testing their immediate effects when it comes to anxiety-relief and pain-relief. The only products that we considered listing were the ones that had an actual effect.

We then rated the products that had an actual effect on metrics like:

  • Transparency of the manufacturer;
  • Taste;
  • Cannabinoid- and terpene-profiles;
  • Effects;
  • Price, and a few more metrics (which you’ll learn about today).

To learn exactly how we rate CBD products, please read our CBD products rating system.

The average stats of our reviewed e-liquids:

  • Average CBD per dollar: 19.69mg;
  • Average hemp-extract (CBD+other cannabinoids and terpenes) per dollar: 38.48mg.

1. CBDfx OG Kush CBD Terpene Vape Liquid (Best Overall and Best Terpene-Rich)

  • Product-type: Vape-juice |
  • CBD: 500mg or 1.52% |
  • THC: ND |
  • CBD(%): 1.52 |
  • THC(%): 0 |
  • CBG(%): 0 |
  • CBC(%): 0 |
  • CBN(%): 0 |
  • CBDA(%): 0 |
  • CBDV(%): 0 |
  • Terpene(%): 13.8 |
  • Other Cannabinoids: No |
  • Terpenes: Yes, but exact amount unknown |
  • Price(CBD/$1): 7.14 mg |
  • Price(unit): $ 70 |
  • Extract-type: broad-spectrum |
  • Satisfaction Guarantee: 30 days |
  • 3th-Party Lab-Tested: Yes |
  • Price-category: Mid-cost
Pros and Cons
  • ­ Extremely high levels of terpenes
  • ­ Tastes truly like OG Kush
  • ­ Only natural flavorings (terpenes)
  • ­ Doesn’t contain other cannabinoids than CBD
  • ­ No recent terpene test
Check current price at:

Price comparison to averages

If you’re a Herbonaut regular, you know that when it comes to CBD products, we are the biggest fans of ‘full spectrum’ CBD products.

When you take CBD together with a full spectrum of other hemp-derived cannabinoids and terpenes, it’s more effective.

Not only do most compounds found in the hemp plant have uniquely beneficial effects…

In some cases, they work together to enhance CBD’s pharmacological effects. This last effect is called the ‘entourage effect’.

CBD vape products are never truly full spectrum. Because to make hemp-extract ‘vapeable’ it needs to go through a manufacturing process that basically removes most of the compounds that are in the original crude hemp extract.

But if you’re looking for a vape oil that comes somewhat close to a full spectrum CBD product, some of the CBDfx vape juices are the best you can get.

I’m talking about their ‘CBD Terpenes Oil’ line. Any oil from this line is infused with naturally-derived terpenes from the hemp plant. The one we like the best is “OG Kush”.

At Herbonaut, we love our CBD products completely natural, and this product tastes exactly like the OG Kush strain with the help of an all-natural hemp-derived terpene-complex.

While this e-liquid doesn’t contain additional hemp-derived cannabinoids like CBG or CBN, it’s PACKED with natural hemp-derived terpenes . A significant percentage (13.8%) of this e-liquid is made of terpenes. This is probably the most terpene-rich CBD product (not just vape juice) that we’ve ever tested.

These terpenes not only give this juice the most amazing natural taste…

But they’re associated with beneficial effects as well.

  • β-myrcene (4.2%) is associated with pain-reducing, anti-inflammatory, anti-depressant, anti-oxidant, anti-bacterial, and sleep-improving effects.
  • β-caryophyllene (1.5%) is associated with pain-reducing, anti-inflammatory, anti-anxiety, anti-depressant, anti-oxidant, and anti-bacterial effects.

This product contains 17 different terpenes and each one of them is associated with at least one health benefit. And even though the CBD-content is lower than most other options on the list, it may be that because of these terpenes a single mg of CBD from this product will be more potent compared to the same mg of CBD from other products.

It’s also one of the few options on the list that comes with a 30-day satisfaction guarantee.

When you look at how much CBD you get per dollar, this product is quite expensive. However, when we look at how much hemp-extract you get per dollar, it’s the most affordable option on the list. One dollar gets you 72mg of hemp extract, a large part of that 72mg being terpenes.

Even though this juice has more terpenes than CBD in it, that’s exactly the reason why we rate it as the ‘best’.

Terpenes are highly beneficial compounds because they are associated with positive health benefits, may act synergistically to CBD, and give the best taste to CBD products in an all-natural way.

And this is the most terpene-rich option on the list.

Click the button below to go to the CBDfx website:

In this guide you'll get a review of the best CBD vape oils that you can currently buy. From premium terpene-infused vape oils, to cheap ones!

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15mg cbd

CBD Liquid Oil Capsules 15mg Hemp Extract | Charlotte’s Web™

When life gets busy, these capsules make it easy to add Charlotte’s Web™ CBD and other naturally occurring phytocannabinoids, terpenes, flavonoids, and essential fatty acids to your wellness routine. They go where you go, delivering a precise serving every time.

main product photo

T he only ingredients are Charlotte’s Web™ full-spectrum hemp extract and organic extra virgin olive oil. A secure band prevents leaks and the capsule is made to reduce oxidation and naturally maintain the integrity of its high-quality ingredients.

Our premium hemp extract is designed to help:

Support a sense of calm for focus*

Manage everyday stresses*

Recovery from exercise-induced inflammation*

Maintain healthy sleep cycles*

More than just CBD: Charlotte’s Web extracts contain CBD plus other naturally occurring phytocannabinoids, terpenes, flavonoids, essential fatty acids, and more in every serving.

Designed to support those with demanding lifestyles, our liquid capsules offer easy, consistent servings of Charlotte’s Web™ that run as hard as you do.

  • Gluten Free, Kosher, 100% Vegan, Allergen Free
  • 100% CO2-extracted
  • USA Grown Hemp
  • Approx. 15mg CBD per 1mL serving
  • Consistency is key. Take CBD capsules regularly; at the same time every day.
  • Store CBD capsules at room temperature away from light.

Common Questions

What is new about Charlotte’s Web liquid-filled capsules?

A lot! First, as the name implies, our new capsules are filled with liquid, Charlotte’s Web hemp extract and organic extra virgin olive oil, to be exact. There are two new concentrations: 15mg and 25mg. Plus, we’ve added a new 90-count bottle, in addition to our 30 and 60 count bottles.

What is the difference between your new liquid-filled capsules and the old powder-filled capsules?

Our new liquid-filled capsules are plant-based, vegan, and contain a higher concentration of CBD. They also come at a lower price per milligram of CBD.

What is the difference between liquid-filled capsules and softgels?

There are a few. For one, our liquid-filled capsules are made with cleaner ingredients, whereas softgels can contain gelatin, glycerin, carrageenan, and other sorbitol additions. They also have thinner capsule walls than most softgels, which are designed to help them disintegrate faster. They are more stable in high-temperature and low-humidity environments as well.

Find answers to more of our questions on our FAQs page.

Charlotte’s Web 15mg CBD oil liquid capsules contain our full-spectrum hemp extract genetics with organic extra virgin olive oil.

How Much CBD Should I take?

How Much CBD Should I take?

Not sure how much CBD to take or which concentration to pick? Don’t worry, it’s perfectly normal to be confused by all the different options, and that’s precisely why we’ve put together this step-by-step guide. Keep reading to find out what you need to know about dosing CBD.

Contents:

Dosing CBD: Where to start?

Although it’s true that how much CBD you should take depends on numerous factors (which we’ll explain shortly), there are two fundamental principles you need to consider first.

A brand you can trust

The first vital consideration is picking a CBD brand you can trust. It’s paramount you know exactly what it is you’re taking, and that the concentration advertised matches what’s in the bottle. Making CBD products is not a simple process, and you need to be confident your CBD oils, capsules, and supplements are free from unwanted additives and chemicals.

Thankfully, at Cibdol, all of our products are subject to rigorous testing, with the results published online and available to the public. Before trying CBD for yourself, you can view a detailed breakdown of the contents in each batch of CBD oil, including the exact concentration of CBD itself.

Start low and go slow

Whether you’re entirely new to CBD or looking to try different products, the second crucial consideration is “start low and go slow”.

The potential of CBD lies in its ability to work in harmony with the body, supporting that all-important state of balance. In this case, balance does not mean flooding the body with CBD, regardless of the compound’s benefits. Instead, the approach is similar to other supplements or vitamins, with a “less is more” attitude.

To truly benefit from CBD, you need to listen to your body and adjust the concentration and/or frequency accordingly.

What factors affect CBD dosage?

With our key watch-outs covered, it’s time to move on to the factors that affect how much CBD you’ll need to take. Remember, though, these factors are important, but they aren’t definitive, so think of them as guidelines rather than rules.

Although research is still in the preliminary stages, early indications suggest there is a potential difference in how CBD and other cannabinoids affect the sexes. It’s believed that hormonal and behavioural differences between men and women could contribute to the overall impact of CBD.

The general summary is that cannabinoids may show a more profound physiological impact in men (food intake and energy balance), and a more profound behavioural impact in women (tension and mood disturbances). These findings are, of course, preliminary, so it’s essential to find what works for you, and not write CBD off if you don’t fall into the categories outlined above.

Height and weight

The simplest way to explain the impact of height and weight on CBD dosing is this—the more you weigh, the more you’ll need to consume to feel the compound’s effect.

CBD works by interacting with a network of receptors (the endocannabinoid system) that extends from head to toe. However, to interact, the compound has to travel around your body first. The rate and efficacy with which CBD is absorbed and ultimately metabolised by the body is thought to differ in heavier individuals versus lighter individuals.

You’ll need to consider the other factors on our list in tandem with this guideline, but, generally speaking, you’ll want to take a higher concentration or dose the greater your height and overall body weight.

For our body to make use of CBD, or any cannabinoid for that matter, we need to break it down into usable parts. Our metabolism plays a crucial role in this process, helping split CBD into smaller pieces that have an easier time travelling around the body.

Although there are many reasons our metabolism slows down, age is a significant factor. When it comes to CBD, you may have to wait longer for the effects to show the older you are, so make sure to give your body the extra time it needs. On the opposite end of the scale, the younger you are, the faster your metabolism, so you may need to consume CBD more often to benefit.

Experience with CBD

The final crucial factor to be aware of when deciding how much CBD to take is your previous experience. If you’ve never tried CBD before, we recommend starting with a low concentration formula, taken once or twice a day.

While the potential side effects of CBD are incredibly mild, everyone reacts to the cannabinoid slightly differently, so it’s important to gauge how you feel before diving headfirst into a bottle of 3000mg or 4000mg CBD oil, for example.

The same rules apply even if you’ve been taking CBD for a while. Always start slow, and build up to your desired dose. Even something as simple as switching from capsules to an isolate powder can dramatically change the impact CBD has on well-being—so take your time.

Choosing the right CBD product

How Much CBD Should I take?

Choosing the right CBD product is less about which one is “best” and more about which product suits your needs. CBD oil and CBD capsules both contain the same full-spectrum extract, but, with a few small changes, the effects of one can last significantly longer than the other.

CBD oil

CBD oils come in a variety of concentrations and carrier oils. For many people, the most noticeable difference in carrier oils is the taste. Olive oil is the closest to an authentic CBD taste, while hemp seed oil is much nuttier, and black cumin seed is somewhere between the two. Picking the flavour you like best will make your wellness journey far more enjoyable.

As for the effect of CBD oil, that depends on how you’re consuming it. CBD oil ingested orally has to contend with the digestive system before it can start circulating your body. It’ll take 30–60 minutes before you feel the effects, but they’ll last much longer as a result.

However, if you drop CBD oil under the tongue, effects are not only more pronounced, but have a quicker onset too. The trade-off is that they don’t last as long, so you’ll need to think about why you’re taking CBD oil, and whether you can keep dosing throughout the day.

CBD Oil 10% (1000mg)

CBD Oil 10% (1000mg)

CBD softgel capsules

Softgel capsules are what we mean when we say “the simple approach”—they’re straightforward, easy to consume on the go, and each contain a uniform dose of CBD. Many people add CBD capsules to their supplement routine for ultimate convenience.

Despite the straightforward nature of CBD capsules, it takes a short while for them to take effect. Just like CBD oil taken orally, capsules have to pass through the digestive system before they start working. Fortunately, the effects of CBD capsules last several hours, so it’s easier to fit them in around work or social activities.

CBD Softgels 10% (1000mg)

CBD Softgels 10% (1000mg)

CBD powder

CBD powder (also called CBD isolate or CBD crystals) is a highly concentrated version of CBD that’s best suited to experienced users. You can add CBD crystals to food or sprinkle them directly under your tongue, but most experienced users prefer infusing them into homemade oils. They’re not the most convenient option for everyday use, but if you’re trying to avoid THC completely, the highly concentrated CBD formula is ideal.

CBD Isolate

CBD Isolate

Which CBD strength is best for you?

When we talk about the strength or concentration of CBD, we’re referring to how many milligrams of CBD a given product contains. If we take our 500mg CBD oil (10ml) as an example, it contains 2.5mg per drop, while our 1000mg oil contains 5mg. As the milligrams of CBD increases, so too does the potency.

If you assume an average daily dose of 3–4 drops, three times a day, that equates to approximately 30mg of CBD (based on our 500mg CBD oil). To give you some idea of the limitations, 160mg is seen as a recommended maximum daily amount.

This high tolerance for CBD is why we recommend starting with our 500mg CBD oil, as it represents a middle-ground between the stronger and more mild concentrations. Even at four drops, three times a day, you are still only consuming 30mg of CBD. Don’t underestimate this compound though—in some cases, this may be enough.

It’s important to stress that everyone’s circumstances, and therefore their dosage, will vary. Give yourself several days on a regular dosage to see how you feel before increasing or decreasing accordingly.

To help you calculate the amount (mg) of CBD you’ll be taking, you can use the following as a guide:

Drops

• 500mg CBD oil: 2.5mg CBD per drop
• 1000mg CBD oil: 5mg CBD per drop

• 1500mg CBD oil: 7.5mg CBD per drop
• 2000mg CBD oil: 10mg CBD per drop

• 3000mg CBD oil: 15mg CBD per drop
• 4000mg CBD oil: 20mg CBD per drop

Capsules

• 500mg CBD softgel capsules: 8.3mg CBD per capsule
• 1000mg CBD softgel capsules: 16.6mg CBD per capsule

• 1500mg CBD softgel capsules: 25mg CBD per capsule
• 2000mg CBD softgel capsules: 33.3mg CBD per capsule

• 3000mg CBD softgel capsules: 50mg CBD per capsule
• 4000mg CBD softgel capsules: 66.6mg CBD per capsule

When and how often should you take CBD?

If you’re trying CBD for the first time, it’s a good idea to divide the recommended serving in half, and build your dose slowly over several days. Once you know how your body responds, you can increase or maintain as you wish.

Similar guidelines apply even if you’re an experienced user. Any time you want to change the concentration, consumption method, or product, build the dose slowly and keep track of how much CBD you’re taking using the guidance above.

As for how many times a day you should take CBD, well, that depends on why you’re taking it in the first place, and how easy it is for you to consume. If you’re taking CBD to benefit overall well-being, we recommended splitting your ideal daily dose across three servings. This approach provides a steady input of CBD.

However, there may be situations when you need the impact of CBD at a moment’s notice. In these cases, a few drops of CBD oil taken under the tongue as needed throughout the day could provide support.

Either way, experiment with your dosing and timing until you find a schedule that’s not only easy to stick to, but provides maximum benefit to you.

Comparing Cibdol to other CBD brands

Once you have an idea of the dosage you want to start with, the next most common query is, “How do our recommendations compare to other brands?”.

In truth, it is a nearly impossible question to answer. Not only does the ideal amount of CBD vary from person to person, but you’ll also need to factor in the extraction method a company uses, their production techniques, and the purity of the final product. All of these attributes play a part in the influence of CBD, and directly affect how much you should consume.

Although we cannot answer for other brands, we can highlight what we take into consideration when producing our CBD oil. State-of-the-art equipment and highly specialised CO₂ extraction, alongside an expert team, ensure safe and seamless production from seed to bottle. The result is a range of products containing unadulterated CBD, independently verified by accredited laboratories.

Finding the best daily CBD dose

We’ve covered a lot of ground, and although dosage may seem like a daunting subject, the main takeaway is—listen to your body.

If we had to offer a bonus takeaway, it would be—try our CBD calculator.

Our CBD dosage calculator gives you a recommended daily amount by using details such as height, weight, gender, and your previous experience with CBD. Not only that, but it’ll even recommend a product that matches the details you enter.

You’ll still need to continue fine-tuning your wellness experience on your own, but our guidelines can offer a good starting point whether you’re a beginner, intermediate, or experienced CBD user.

If you’d prefer to first browse all of the CBD oils, capsules, supplements, and creams we have to offer, visit the Cibdol store. Or, if you’re still trying to fine-tune your wellness journey, our CBD Encyclopedia has all the answers to popular queries.

Follow the link to find out how much CBD you should be taking, how Cibdol compares to other CBD brands, and which CBD product is right for you.

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cbd oil for cats with seizures

CBD Oil for Seizures & Epilepsy in Cats

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Posted by Michael Jones on January 22, 2020
Updated at: April 06, 2021

If you have never seen what a seizure looks like, you may be terrified to witness your cat having one. They aren’t easy to watch because you can’t do much for them except keep them from hurting themselves.

What you can do is protect them from the dangers around them. Move them away from potential hazards like stairwells or drop-offs and keep their head away from furniture or rocks that could harm them. After you do this, it’s just a matter of waiting for the seizure to pass.

If your cat suffers from seizures and epilepsy, a suitable alternative that may help manage them is CBD oil. It’s worth looking into as it has the potential to help your furry friend.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

What Is CBD Oil?

CBD is the acronym used for cannabidiol. While other cannabinoids may be present in several types of plants all over the world, CBD is unique in that it is only found in cannabis and accounts for up to 40% of the plant extract. Therefore, being a cannabinoid has nothing to do with whether it derives from marijuana; it depends on the molecular structure.

CBD oil derives from hemp. The reason is that hemp has the least concentrations of THC (the cannabinoid that marijuana is famous for as it causes you to feel the head high). THC, however, is toxic to animals such as dogs and cats. Therefore, hemp-derived CBD is preferable for two reasons.

  1. It is naturally low, almost devoid of THC. In most states, CBD oil sales are only legal if the product contains less than .03% THC.
  2. CBD is legal in all 50 states because it is low in THC and cannot make anyone high.

Is CBD Legal for Cats?

As mentioned above, when CBD derives from hemp, it is low in THC and perfectly legal. You need to ensure you are buying CBD extracted from hemp, as it can come from marijuana as well. This type should only be for sale in a legal marijuana dispensary in a state that has legalized medical marijuana. It will not be safe for pets, however.

What Effects Does CBD Have on a Cat?

CBD can trigger the body’s Endocannabinoid System (ECS) to work more efficiently. The process improves the body’s response to pain, tremors, appetite, metabolism, and more.

The ECS is responsible for bringing balance back to the body. Its primary job is to maintain the status of homeostasis within the body. Homeostasis improves the efficiency of every body system, with the ECS working as a “supervisor” for these systems. All mammals have an ECS, and scientists believe it is the most critical system of the body.

We have only known about the ECS since the 1990s, and researchers are still learning much about it. Many people have never heard of it because information about the ECS didn’t exist when we were in school.

Are There Any Negative Side Effects for Cats?

If your cat is rubbing their head, they may have a headache. The most common of the three is diarrhea. If you notice it, reduce the amount of CBD you’re giving your cat or skip a dose entirely. Reducing or stopping treatment will typically mitigate the problem. Reduce the amount of the doses going forward until they’ve had a chance to adjust.CBD is not addictive. There have been very few reports of side-effects, and they have never been life-threatening. The worst side-effects may be extreme tiredness, diarrhea, or headaches. You do not need to have any concerns about your cat getting high from using CBD. It will not impair their ability to function normally. Nor will it cause them to have any issues with dependency.

How Can I Get a Hold of CBD Oil?

CBD is available in many places, especially on the internet. Please, do some research to learn the difference between a quality CBD oil and one that may be questionable. It’s also essential that you speak to your veterinarian and keep them in the loop when it comes to decisions about your cat’s care. They should agree with whatever you decide to do and know about it.

Is CBD the Right Option for My Cat?

It’s important to understand that CBD is not a cure. It is an excellent tool for managing many different conditions, such as epilepsy and seizure conditions. Whether it’s the best option for your furry friend, is something only you can answer.CBD may be the right choice for your cat, but only you can determine that. It requires you to do a fair amount of research and learn the pros and cons. You should understand the general way in which it works within the body, and you should prepare for the good and the bad.

You must run it by your veterinarian, especially if your cat is already taking other medications. CBD can be a natural blood thinner, and this means that it could interact with other medicines that also thin the blood. Your veterinarian will be able to inform you properly, as will your own research.

Sources:

Dr. Ivana Vukasinovic

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, University of Belgrade

Ivana Vukasinovic grew up in Serbia and attended the University of Belgrade where she received a degree in Veterinary medicine in 2012 and later completed surgical residency working mostly with livestock. Her first year of practice was split between busy small animal practice and emergency clinic, and after two more years of treating many different species of animals, she opened her own veterinary pharmacy where an interest in canine and feline nutrition emerged with an accent on fighting animal obesity. In her free time, she acts as a foster parent for stray animals before their adoption, likes to read SF books and making salted caramel cookies.

Thanks for stopping by!
P.S. We Love You!

Sincerely,
The Innovet Team

Please do not ask for emergency or specific medical questions about your pets in the comments . Innovet Pet Products is unable to provide you with specific medical advice or counseling. A detailed physical exam, patient history, and an established veterinarian are required to provide specific medical advice. If you are worried that your pet requires emergency attention or if you have specific medical questions related to your pet’s current or chronic health conditions, please contact or visit your local/preferred veterinarian, an animal-specific poison control hotline, or your local emergency veterinary care center.

Please share your experiences and stories, your opinions and feedback about this blog, or what you’ve learned that you’d like to share with others.

If you have never seen what a seizure looks like, you may be terrified to witness your cat having one. They aren’t easy to watch because you can’t do much for them except keep them from hurting themselves. What you can do is protect them from the dangers around them. Move them away from potential hazards like stairwell

CBD for Dogs and Cats—What’s New?

Donald Vaughan is a freelance writer based in Raleigh, North Carolina. His work has appeared in Writer’s Digest, Boys’ Life, Military Officer Magazine, Today’s Veterinary Business, and numerous other publications. He is also the founder of Triangle Association of Freelancers.

CBD for Dogs and Cats—What’s New?

C annabidiol (CBD), a nonpsychoactive molecule derived from cannabis, is increasingly being t outed as an effective treatment in humans for conditions ranging from chronic pain to anxiety to insomnia. As a result, public interest in the use of CBD on pets has also grown, industry analysts report. But whereas research on the effects of CBD in humans has been ongoing for many years, similar research on dogs, cats, and other species is just beginning. Many questions remain regarding safety, efficacy, dosage, and more.

However, that hasn’t stopped eager pet owners from turning to their veterinarians for information and advice regarding the use of CBD. In many cases, the owners have successfully used CBD to treat their own medical conditions, and believe it would be equally beneficial for their animals. This places veterinarians and veterinary nurses in a difficult position because, while the sale and use of CBD are legal in many states, the regulatory landscape for veterinary professionals is unclear and varies from state to state.

CBD is one of two major phytocannabinoids found in cannabis—the other being tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is the component that gets users high—says Jeffrey Powers, DVM, chairman of the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Council on Biologic and Therapeutic Agents, and owner of Veterinary Clinics North, which has clinics in East Jordan and Beaver Island, Mich. “CBD has received quite a bit of interest recently in veterinary medicine,” Dr. Powers notes. “It has been shown to be an effective analgesic, and a strong anti-inflammatory as well.”

To date, CBD research has focused primarily on seizure control and pain reduction in companion animals. In 2018, researchers at Cornell University published a study in Frontiers in Veterinary Science on the pharmacokinetics, safety, and clinical efficacy of cannabidiol in osteoarthritic dogs. 1 The results showed no observable side effects and a significant decrease in pain and increase in activity based on Canine Brief Pain Inventory and Hudson activity scores.

More recently, Stephanie McGrath, MS, DVM, DACVIM (Neurology), assistant professor in the Department of Clinical Sciences at the James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, investigated the potential benefits of CBD in treating idiopathic seizures in dogs, a study funded by Applied Basic Science Corporation. 2 Though the study group was small—16 subjects—the results found a significant 89% reduction in seizure frequency in dogs receiving CBD at 2.5 mg/kg q12h compared to a 43% reduction in the control group. Both study groups were concurrently receiving conventional anti-epileptic drug therapy. 2

“The study had a small number of dogs, so we have to be careful how much power we give it,” Dr. McGrath notes. “We have started another larger study funded by the AKC Canine Health Foundation. That allowed us to enroll a larger group of dogs, and we are doing a crossover study so every dog gets the placebo during one arm of the study and CBD during the other. If this were to show there is a significant difference when the dogs were on CBD versus not, I think that would add a lot more weight to CBD as an anticonvulsant.”

Additional studies are ongoing in a number of areas, including the use of CBD in species other than cats and dogs, but their findings won’t be available until they are completed. “From my connections in the veterinary world, I know there are studies out there that are looking to further describe the pharmacokinetics of CBD as well as look at varying doses of CBD for different conditions,” says Gary Richter, DVM, owner of Holistic Veterinary Care and Rehabilitation Center in Oakland, Calif. “They are also looking at CBD for other clinical indications beyond seizures and arthritis pain,” including anxiety.

GRAY AREA Hemp products were descheduled under the 2018 Farm Bill, but the U.S. DEA lists cannabis and cannabinoid products—under which CBD products fall—as Schedule I controlled substances. This iffy legal status can pose a significant challenge for veterinary professionals. igorstevanovic/shutterstock.com

Though clinical research is just starting to rev up, anecdotal evidence regarding the therapeutic use of CBD abounds. Dr. Powers, for example, has used it on his own pets, including a St. Bernard named Ella who was afflicted with arthritis and experienced severe storm anxiety. “I tried almost all of the products available for the treatment of those conditions, but found them ineffective,” he recalls. “I decided to try hemp CBD oil and chews and Ella has done extremely well from several standpoints. CBD may be a good alternative to NSAIDs, which can cause problems in some pets.”

Casara Andre, DVM, cVMA, founder and director of Veterinary Cannabis Education and Consulting in Wheat Ridge, Colo., is another advocate who has used CBD on her pets. Her cat Mattie was afflicted with kidney problems, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and arthritis. “I really didn’t have any good options for her, so I tried a CBD-dominant tincture, which offered more scalability,” Dr. Andre says. “I saw a difference, but it took about 6 weeks. I noticed small improvements in her appetite, willingness to interact, and small play attempts. When I began to incorporate a product with more even ratios of CBD to THC, I saw dramatic improvement. Mattie started eating better, playing, and no more IBD. It gave me my cat back, and gave Mattie 4 more amazing years.”

Dr. Andre used a CBD-dominant product that also contained a small amount of THC. While many pet-specific products contain CBD only, some studies have suggested that it works more effectively when paired with other molecules, such as THC.

“The problem we’re running into is that some research shows that hemp extracts, which have, say, a 1:20 THC to CBD ratio, along with other components such as terpenes and other minor cannabinoids, actually may be more effective at preventing seizures than purified extracts,” notes Dr. Powers. “I believe as a nation we need to develop more knowledge in the whole area of cannabis medicine from a widespread standpoint.”

Until recently, cannabis research has been all but impossible due to the plant’s status as a Schedule I drug, which puts it in the same category as heroin and LSD. For decades, the positions of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has been that cannabis has no medicinal value but does have a high risk of addiction and abuse. There is a movement to reclassify cannabis, and demands that the cannabis grown at the government’s only grow facility at the University of Mississippi be of the same potency as cannabis strains now available in states where medical and recreational use of cannabis is legal, such as Colorado, Oregon, and California.

The iffy legal status of cannabis across the United States can pose a significant challenge to CBD researchers who, depending on where they live and who they work for, could find their studies shut down or dramatically diminished in scope. “I’m hoping the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill [which legalized industrial hemp production and sales nationwide] will help move along some of the research by descheduling hemp, but on a state by state basis it might be a challenge,” says Dr. McGrath.

As noted, the legal issues surrounding medical cannabis also affect veterinarians, whose hands are tied by their state veterinary boards regarding even the discussion of CBD with their clients. This places veterinarians in a difficult position when it comes to harm reduction education, Dr. Richter says.

“I have people coming into my practice asking about cannabis, sometimes bringing in cannabis products they have purchased at dispensaries or online, and asking, ‘How do I give them? How much do I give?’” he reports. “My question to the veterinary medical board has been, do you honestly want me to turn those people around and send them out the door to get information from someone with no medical training, like the guy who works at the dispensary or the kid who works in the pet store? That’s a question the veterinary medical board has never been able to answer to anyone’s satisfaction. I believe that as a veterinarian I have an enormous responsibility to safeguard my patients and provide accurate information to my clients. They have put us in a position where we’re damned if we do and damned if we don’t.”

That may soon change in California thanks to AB-2215, legislation passed in 2018 that, effective January 1, 2020, allows veterinarians to legally discuss the use of cannabis with clients. The law required the state veterinary board to release guidelines confirming what veterinarians can and cannot do in regard to cannabis education ( cvma.net/marijuana-and-pets ).

The AVMA has expressed support for stronger research into the medical benefits of cannabis, and in July responded to a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) request for public comment on the topic with a lengthy letter outlining issues and areas of research it would like to see, including dosage, efficacy, and safety.

Former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb has also publicly endorsed sensible government regulation of cannabis with the goal of better research. In September it was announced that the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health would be funding 9 grants totaling $3 million for CBD research in humans. “The science is lagging behind the public use and interest,” explained deputy director Dr. David Shurtleff in a release. “We’re doing our best to catch up here.”

To help educate veterinary nurses about the medical use of CBD and more, Veterinary Cannabis Education and Consulting offers a veterinary cannabis counselor certification course, notes Dr. Andre. She believes strongly, however, that veterinary professionals still have an ethical obligation to educate their clients when able.

“No matter in which state they live, the ability to provide harm reduction education is implicit in being a veterinarian or any member of the veterinary profession,” she notes. “We are all in this industry to help animals stay safe, and there is so much happening in product development on the human side that we need to be able to at least say, ‘Don’t do these things. If you are going to use cannabis on your own, do it safely and avoid these particular pitfalls.’ It’s important to realize that answering a client’s question has nothing to do with the substance itself. It has to do with us keeping our oath and protecting our patients and being their advocate. Telling clients not to give their pets products containing xylitol or to be sure it’s not contaminated with pesticides—that absolutely is in the veterinarian’s domain. Education is always what we’re allowed to do.”

1. Gamble LJ, Boesch JM, Frye CW, et al. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and clinical efficacy of cannabidiol treatment in osteoarthritic dogs. Front Vet Sci 2018;5:165.

2. McGrath S, Bartner LR, Rao S, et al. Randomized blinded controlled clinical trial to assess the effect of oral cannabidiol administration in addition to conventional antiepileptic treatment on seizure frequency in dogs with intractable idiopathic epilepsy. JAVMA 2019;254(11):1301-1308.

As a result of public interest in the medicinal use of CBD in human medicine, interest in its possible use for pets is growing as well.

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does cbd oil show up on a drug test mn

Some CBD products may yield cannabis-positive urine drug tests

In a study of six adults, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report evidence that a single vaping episode of cannabis that is similar in chemical composition to that found in legal hemp products could possibly result in positive results on urine drug screening tests commonly used by many employers and criminal justice or school systems.

The U.S. government defines hemp as any crop of cannabis containing 0.3% THC or less in dry weight. THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol) is the substance in cannabis that confers a “high” and produces the subjective and cognitive effects that are typically synonymous with cannabis. The 2018 U.S. Farm Bill legalized the production and sale of hemp, and now as a result, consumer hemp products, such as oils, vaping cartridges and hemp flowers for smoking can be legally purchased in specialty stores, general retail stores and through websites across the U.S.

Hemp is now increasingly finding use in medicine and wellness markets, particularly for its component CBD, short for cannabidiol, which is one of the more than 100 cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant. According to New York-based investment bank Cowen & Co., the market for CBD last year ranged from $600 million and $2 billion in sales. Despite the size of this booming industry, it remains largely unregulated.

In a paper published Nov. 4 in the Journal of Analytical Toxicology, the researchers report that two out of six study participants tested positive after vaping cannabis that contained 0.39% THC using urine testing methods that are consistent with testing frequently performed for employment-related or criminal justice-related urine drug testing programs. Though the cannabis used in this study does not currently meet the federal definition of hemp, the THC concentration of 0.39% exceeds federal regulation by just 0.09%.

“People who use legal hemp products for medical intent rarely just use them once as we did in this study, and prior studies show that THC and its metabolites may accumulate with repeated use,” says postdoctoral fellow Tory Spindle, Ph.D., a researcher in the Behavioral Pharmacology Research Unit at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. “What this means is that people need to be wary of single-dose or cumulative THC exposure and be aware that these now legal products may cause an unexpected positive result on a drug test.”

“Because the market for CBD products is so new and the popularity of use is growing so quickly, we want the public to be aware that a positive drug test is possible,” says Ryan Vandrey, Ph.D., associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Vandrey and his collaborators at the University of Pennsylvania previously showed in a JAMA study that 21% of CBD/hemp products sold on the Internet contained THC, even though it wasn’t listed on the product labels. “I have a hard time finding anyone who hasn’t used a CBD product at least once, but most are completely unaware of the possibility of THC exposure or a positive drug test as a result of using these newly legalized products,” says Vandrey.

trials demonstrated CBD to be an effective treatment for two rare forms of pediatric epilepsy, however, there is currently insufficient evidence to support use for any other health condition according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Despite this, CBD product suppliers and consumers claim benefits of CBD for a wide range of purposes, including everything from anxiety to insomnia to general wellness. CBD products can be swallowed in the form of an oil/tincture, eaten in a food product (e.g., gummy bears), inhaled using “vape pens” similar to electronic cigarettes, or applied topically to the skin in a cream, patch, balm or gel.

For the current study, the researchers recruited three women and three men with an average age of 31 years old. One participant self-reported as African American and the rest as white.

The batch of cannabis used in this particular study contained 10.5% CBD and 0.39% THC, a 27 to 1 ratio of CBD to THC that is similar to what is often found in legal hemp/CBD products. In the study, research volunteers vaporized a little less than 1 gram of cannabis, which contained a total dose of 100 milligrams of CBD and 3.7 milligrams of THC. To vape the cannabis, heated cannabis vapor was collected into a balloon that was then inhaled by the participant.

In addition to vaping the high CBD/low THC cannabis, study volunteers also were given pure CBD in a capsule, vaporized pure CBD and placebo (a mock CBD pill and vaporized cannabis in which CBD and THC had been removed) in three other dosing sessions, one week apart from each other. In all active drug conditions (excluding placebo), the CBD dose delivered was 100 milligrams per session.

The drug testing cut-off used to determine a “positive” result in this study was a “screening” concentration of at least 50 nanograms per milliliter of THCCOOH, a metabolite used to indicate whether someone has used cannabis, in the urine sample using an on-site “dipstick” test. A positive on that test was then “confirmed” at a 15 nanograms per milliliter cut-off of THCCOOH using a more sensitive test method.

Two of the six participants who vaped the low-THC/high-CBD cannabis tested positive for THCCOOH.

No positive urine drug test results were observed in the other test sessions (pure CBD capsules, pure CBD vape or placebo).

“These results suggest that pure CBD, used once by itself, will not cause a positive drug test,” says Vandrey. Adding to this, Spindle points out that it “does not take much THC exposure to trigger a positive test for some people.” There may be variation from person to person in drug metabolism and puffing behaviors such as inhalation depth, which might contribute to the breakdown or buildup of cannabinoids in the body, the researchers say.

The team says they plan to repeat their studies using products that fall within the current federal hemp regulations with respect to THC content, and additionally study the impact of repeated CBD/hemp exposure on drug testing outcomes.

Other authors on the study were Edward Cone and George Bigelow of Johns Hopkins, David Kuntz of Clinical Reference Laboratory, John Mitchell of RTI International and Ronald Flegel of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

This research was supported by SAMHSA and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (T32DA07209).

COI: Vandrey has been a paid consultant for or received honoraria from Zynerba Pharmaceuticals, FSD Pharma and Canopy Health Innovations Inc.

Hemp is now increasingly finding use in medicine and wellness markets, particularly for its component CBD, short for cannabidiol, which is one of the more than 100 cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant. According to New York-based investment bank Cowen & Co., the market for CBD last year ranged from $600 million and $2 billion in sales. Despite the size of this booming industry, it remains largely unregulated.

In a paper published Nov. 4 in the Journal of Analytical Toxicology, the researchers report that two out of six study participants tested positive after vaping cannabis that contained 0.39% THC using urine testing methods that are consistent with testing frequently performed for employment-related or criminal justice-related urine drug testing programs. Though the cannabis used in this study does not currently meet the federal definition of hemp, the THC concentration of 0.39% exceeds federal regulation by just 0.09%.

“People who use legal hemp products for medical intent rarely just use them once as we did in this study, and prior studies show that THC and its metabolites may accumulate with repeated use,” says postdoctoral fellow Tory Spindle, Ph.D., a researcher in the Behavioral Pharmacology Research Unit at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. “What this means is that people need to be wary of single-dose or cumulative THC exposure and be aware that these now legal products may cause an unexpected positive result on a drug test.”

“Because the market for CBD products is so new and the popularity of use is growing so quickly, we want the public to be aware that a positive drug test is possible,” says Ryan Vandrey, Ph.D., associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Vandrey and his collaborators at the University of Pennsylvania previously showed in a JAMA study that 21% of CBD/hemp products sold on the Internet contained THC, even though it wasn’t listed on the product labels. “I have a hard time finding anyone who hasn’t used a CBD product at least once, but most are completely unaware of the possibility of THC exposure or a positive drug test as a result of using these newly legalized products,” says Vandrey.

Trials demonstrated CBD to be an effective treatment for two rare forms of pediatric epilepsy, however, there is currently insufficient evidence to support use for any other health condition according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Despite this, CBD product suppliers and consumers claim benefits of CBD for a wide range of purposes, including everything from anxiety to insomnia to general wellness. CBD products can be swallowed in the form of an oil/tincture, eaten in a food product (e.g., gummy bears), inhaled using “vape pens” similar to electronic cigarettes, or applied topically to the skin in a cream, patch, balm or gel.

For the current study, the researchers recruited three women and three men with an average age of 31 years old. One participant self-reported as African American and the rest as white.

The batch of cannabis used in this particular study contained 10.5% CBD and 0.39% THC, a 27 to 1 ratio of CBD to THC that is similar to what is often found in legal hemp/CBD products. In the study, research volunteers vaporized a little less than 1 gram of cannabis, which contained a total dose of 100 milligrams of CBD and 3.7 milligrams of THC. To vape the cannabis, heated cannabis vapor was collected into a balloon that was then inhaled by the participant.

In addition to vaping the high CBD/low THC cannabis, study volunteers also were given pure CBD in a capsule, vaporized pure CBD and placebo (a mock CBD pill and vaporized cannabis in which CBD and THC had been removed) in three other dosing sessions, one week apart from each other. In all active drug conditions (excluding placebo), the CBD dose delivered was 100 milligrams per session.

The drug testing cut-off used to determine a “positive” result in this study was a “screening” concentration of at least 50 nanograms per milliliter of THCCOOH, a metabolite used to indicate whether someone has used cannabis, in the urine sample using an on-site “dipstick” test. A positive on that test was then “confirmed” at a 15 nanograms per milliliter cut-off of THCCOOH using a more sensitive test method.

Two of the six participants who vaped the low-THC/high-CBD cannabis tested positive for THCCOOH.

No positive urine drug test results were observed in the other test sessions (pure CBD capsules, pure CBD vape or placebo).

“These results suggest that pure CBD, used once by itself, will not cause a positive drug test,” says Vandrey. Adding to this, Spindle points out that it “does not take much THC exposure to trigger a positive test for some people.” There may be variation from person to person in drug metabolism and puffing behaviors such as inhalation depth, which might contribute to the breakdown or buildup of cannabinoids in the body, the researchers say.

The team says they plan to repeat their studies using products that fall within the current federal hemp regulations with respect to THC content, and additionally study the impact of repeated CBD/hemp exposure on drug testing outcomes.

Other authors on the study were Edward Cone and George Bigelow of Johns Hopkins, David Kuntz of Clinical Reference Laboratory, John Mitchell of RTI International and Ronald Flegel of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

This research was supported by SAMHSA and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (T32DA07209).

A small study concludes that caution is warranted for users of ‘high CBD, low THC’ cannabis products.

Will CBD Cause Me to Test Positive on a Drug Test?

Many employers, for a number of good reasons, drug test their employees. Jobs that require strict attention, such as truck drivers and those operating heavy machinery would be ill-suited to those under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Those in the medical field, people working with young children, police officers, firefighters, and airline pilots are just a few of those who should expect to be tested upon hire and through random drug testing.

Most drug tests used for employment run from 5 to 10 panels. They screen for drugs such as barbiturates, cocaine, amphetamines, opiates, and THC. THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol, is one of over 100 cannabinoids identified in cannabis. This molecule is the psychoactive component of the plant. It is what’s responsible for getting users “high.”

Drug tests almost universally screen for the cannabinoid THC. CBD, or cannabidiol, is also a cannabinoid identified in hemp and marijuana. However, it has different properties from THC. It is not regarded as psychoactive, nor is it thought to cause impairment. Drug tests generally do not test for this molecule.

Nonetheless, because CBD is produced from cannabis (and yes, hemp is part of the cannabis family), taking anything made from full-spectrum hemp extract could theoretically trigger a positive THC test. Legally, hemp is defined as any cannabis plant with less than 0.3% delta-9 THC. Ingesting anything with less than 0.3% THC will emphatically not get you “high;” however, the trace amount metabolized by your body could show up in drug tests. Many employment drug tests are designed to detect very small amounts of the substance. In addition, the molecule is fat-soluble, and as a result, can remain in your system for days to weeks.

Whether trace amounts of THC show up on a drug test depend on a number of factors. Body composition, activity level, frequency of use, and concentration of dose all affect THC levels. For example, someone who is inactive with high levels of body fat are more likely to hold onto the trace amounts of CBD as those who are lean and work out daily. Genetics and metabolism also likely contribute to differences.

Full-spectrum products are preferred by many users because not only do they contain CBD, they contain small amounts of other cannabinoids, many of which are thought to have beneficial and synergistic properties.

If you are drug tested and have only been using CBD products, speaking to your employer may be your only option. Your employer will have the final word on whether they accept your explanation, but saving evidence of your use of CBD may help. Unfortunately, there is no way to differentiate the THC from a CBD product from that of a legal hemp product.

However, the good news for those who are drug tested is that CBD can be isolated from other cannabinoids. Our CBD Isolate is one such product. CBD isolate is still beneficial, and many have found that it works for their issues. The CBD isolate has undetectable levels of THC and on its own will not produce a positive THC drug test.

Worth noting, though is that CBD is not regulated. The tinctures found in health food stores, gas stations, and retail boutiques has not gone through a standardized testing protocol. In fact, the labeling accuracy of most products is highly suspect. The majority in the study were found to not contain levels of CBD on the bottle. Some contained more than the legal amount of THC. And a few even contained synthetic cannabinoids.

When selecting a CBD product, it is essential to go with an ethical company where strict testing and good quality control are standards. We guarantee the potency and purity of our products.

Many employers, for a number of good reasons, drug test their employees. Jobs that require strict attention, such as truck drivers and those operating heavy machinery would be ill-suited to those under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Those in the medical field, people working with young children, police officers, fi

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The therapeutic potential of cannabis in Alzheimer’s disease

By Ester Aso

PhD in Biology from the Universitat Pompeu Fabra, currently performing the tasks of Associate Professor of Pharmacology at the University of Barcelona. Her research work has focused over the last 15 years on the study of the role of the endocannabinoid system in mental illness and, especially, on the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids against neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s. As a result of this research, she has published 20 scientific articles related to cannabinoids and has participated in numerous research projects financed by public and private funds. Member of the Spanish Society of Research on Cannabinoids since 2004, she was a member of the Board of Directors from 2011 to 2 105.

Over the past 15 years, scientific evidence has been accumulating, most of it obtained from experimental models, which support the hypothesis that certain cannabinoids may be beneficial for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. This paper summarises this evidence and sets out the challenges ahead and future prospects in this promising field of research.

Alzheimer’s disease

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia in old age. It is estimated that it currently affects some 50 million people around the world and that this figure could double every 20 years, mainly due to the continued growth of life expectancy in our society [1]. It is a highly incapacitating disease characterized by a progressive deterioration of cognitive and mental abilities. Initially it causes problems remembering words, conversations or recent events and may be combined with apathy and depression. As the disease progresses, the patient suffers problems communicating, widespread confusion, spatial and temporal disorientation and behavioural changes that may include aggressiveness. Approximately 10 years after the onset of these symptoms, physical deterioration is usually very advanced, requiring continued attention for all daily activities, and inevitably leads to the death of the patient. The long process of the disease involves an enormous emotional cost to the patient and his or her relatives and an enormous economic cost to the health and social care systems.

Despite the numerous efforts made in the field of pharmacological research against Alzheimer’s disease in the past 30 years, today the only treatments available may produce discrete improvements at the cognitive and functional level but in no way halt or reverse the neurodegenerative process associated with Alzheimer’s disease [2]. Due to the limitations of these drugs, there is an alarming need for more effective therapeutic options to address the growing population affected by this dementia.

In this sense, the scientific community is working hard to find new therapies that can reduce the impact of this disease. There are currently up to 400 active clinical trials to evaluate different experimental treatments, oriented in general to alleviate some of the molecular alterations that have been described in the course of Alzheimer’s disease. Among the therapeutic strategies evaluated are those designed to reduce the toxicity of the beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) and the hyperphosphorylation of the tau protein, the two most characteristic pathological events of the disease, which have been related to neuronal death and the consequent progressive deterioration of mental functions [3]. In addition, other experimental therapies are trying to assess if the reduction of the inflammatory process and oxidative stress that accompanies the accumulation of Aβ in the form of extracellular plaques and the formation of neurofibrillary tangles of hyperphosphorylated tau in the patient’s brain, might prevent the progress of the disease. However, to date, none of these experimental approaches have been completely satisfactory and the approval of new drugs for the treatment of Alzheimer’s is not anticipated in the short term.

The failure of these therapeutic strategies may be due to the fact that in many cases they have been tested in patients at moderate or advanced stages of the disease, when the possibilities for reversal of the neurodegenerative process are more limited. Therefore, the search for markers of early detection of the disease has become another fundamental pillar of the research into Alzheimer’s disease, as it should facilitate intervention at the early stages of the neurodegenerative process and thus increase the chances of success. But in addition, it is likely that the fact that most of these experimental therapies tested in patients to date have been designed to act specifically only on a single pathological event of the many that occur sequentially or in parallel during the onset of Alzheimer’s disease has also contributed to this failure, so the complexity of pathology as a whole has not been addressed.

For this reason, a new scientific trend advocates the search for new multiple target therapies against Alzheimer, which are capable of simultaneously modulating the main pathological events that determine the progressive functional deterioration of patients. In this context, the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids against this disease has been gaining increasing interest, supported by increasing evidence demonstrating an improvement in Alzheimer-type symptomatology in various models of the disease after exposure to these compounds. This improvement would be associated with cannabinoid-induced modulation of both processes associated with Aβ and tau hyperphosphorylation and inflammation and oxidative stress, among others, as described in the following paragraphs and in some scientific reviews on the subject [4, 5].

The endocannabinoid system in Alzheimer’s disease

Early evidence that cannabinoid compounds might be useful against Alzheimer’s was obtained from the study of the composition of the endocannabinoid system (consisting of receptors on which cannabinoids, endogenous ligands and enzymes responsible for the synthesis and degradation of these ligands act), in post-mortem samples of brains of patients suffering from the disease. Thus, the research groups of Dr. Julián Romero and Dr. María de Ceballos, both located in Madrid, pioneered the description of the increase in the expression of the cannabinoid receptor CB2 in the microglia cells (charged with modulating inflammatory processes in the brain, among other defensive functions) that are activated around the amyloid plates characteristic of Alzheimer’s. These observations were subsequently corroborated by other researchers and animal models of the disease. Similarly, it is widely demonstrated and accepted that in focal points of inflammation associated with Aβ plates there is an increase in the fatty acid expression of amide hydrolase (FAAH), the enzyme responsible for the degradation of endogenous cannabinoid ligand anandamide [6]. These findings support the hypothesis that the CB2 receptor and FAAH may be interesting pharmacological targets in the fight against Alzheimer’s [6, 7].

There is, on the other hand, some controversy over the affect in Alzheimer’s of the levels of the cannabinoid receptor CB1, abundantly expressed in the brain and with important functions in the homeostatic control of neuronal activity under physiological conditions. Some studies have shown an increase in the activity of this receptor at early stages of the disease, followed by a marked reduction in its levels at advanced stages [8]. However, other studies have not been able to find significant differences in CB1 levels between the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease and those of healthy people [9]. However, this controversy does not reduce the interest in modulating CB1 receptor activity in Alzheimer cases, given its neuroprotective character and its involvement in numerous processes that are affected during the course of the disease. In fact, a recent study carried out by our research group showed that this receptor plays a fundamental role in the progression of Alzheimer’s as its elimination, through genetic manipulation techniques, leads to an acceleration of the degenerative process and leads to premature death in an animal model of the disease [10].

Clinical and preclinical evidence of the usefulness of cannabinoids against Alzheimer’s

Most of the existing evidence on the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids has been obtained by the use of animal and cellular models that replicate some of the alterations that occur in a brain affected by Alzheimer’s. However, it is worth noting that the limited clinical data obtained to date also supports the usefulness of these compounds to mitigate some of the behavioural alterations associated with Alzheimer’s. Thus, the four clinical trials conducted with a small group of patients in advanced stages of the disease treated for several weeks with a Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol analogue (THC) resulted in a reduction in agitation and aggressiveness and an increase in body weight in patients who previously rejected food. Equally important, the adverse effects associated to treatment with cannabinoids described in these early clinical trials were limited to euphoria, drowsiness, and fatigue, without requiring the interruption of treatment in any of the patients, which indicates that the analogues of the THC may have an acceptable safety profile for use in patients of advanced age (reviewed in [11]).

As mentioned above, it has been the results obtained in experimental models of the disease that have contributed the most evidence on the potential usefulness of cannabinoids in Alzheimer’s. Thus, numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that the stimulation of CB1 and CB2 receptors, either by endogenous ligands, synthetic or natural cannabinoids (THC and cannabidiol or CBD), reduces the neural toxicity of peptide Aβ, increasing the viability of neurons in culture and protecting from cognitive impairment induced by this peptide in animals inoculated with it or genetically manipulated to express it abundantly. It is important to note that in all cases the doses of cannabinoids that have been tested in experimental models have been much lower than those that produce the characteristic psychoactive effects of cannabis use. This neuronal protection against the peptide Aβ could be associated on the one hand with the ability of cannabinoids with activity at the CB2 receptor to promote the elimination of this peptide and to reduce the signalling pathways activated by Aβ that lead to cell death, and on the other to the stimulation of neurogenesis (formation of new neurons) and the maintenance of synaptic boutons, which are crucial for correct communication between the neurons [4, 5].

In addition, the neuroprotective effect of cannabinoids against Aβ would also be associated with their ability to mitigate other harmful effects induced by this peptide beyond the directly toxic effect on neurons. Thus, the inflammatory response triggered by the presence of the peptide Aβ, which when it becomes chronic is harmful to the brain tissue, is reduced after administration of cannabinoids that stimulate the CB2 and also the CB1 receptor, such as THC, endocannabinoids, or some synthetic agonists. Likewise, CBD, whose mechanism of action is not completely elucidated, has anti-inflammatory properties in models of Alzheimer’s disease. Similarly, some evidence points to a reduction in oxidative stress induced by peptide Aβ following the administration of CBD, THC and synthetic agonists of the CB2 receptor, so that they would contribute to the protection of the cellular structures most vulnerable to oxidative damage and thus preserve their functionality [4, 5].

Other additional benefits that would result from the use of cannabinoids in Alzheimer’s disease would be, according to preclinical studies, an improvement in vascular dysfunction characteristic of this dementia and the ability to absorb glucose, favouring the supply of oxygen and nutrients needed for normal brain functioning. In addition, certain cannabinoids with CB1 receptor activity may regulate neurotransmission, either by modulating the same therapeutic targets as the drugs currently approved for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, or by modulating the balance between excitatory and neuronal inhibitory activity, which is compromised during the neurodegenerative process associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Finally, it should be noted that there is evidence that certain natural or synthetic agonists of the CB1 receptor and CBD are capable of reducing tau hyperphosphorylation in both cultured and animal cells [4, 5].

All these effects together would contribute to the cognitive improvement observed following administration of natural cannabinoids, including THC and CBD [12], or synthetics in several animal models of the disease.

Outstanding challenges and future prospects

Considering all the scientific evidence mentioned above and the complexity of Alzheimer’s disease, it seems clear that the ability of cannabinoids to modulate in parallel many of the alterations that occur during the course of this disease potentially gives them a therapeutic advantage over current treatments and other experimental drugs aimed at modifying a single pathological event. Based on current knowledge, the optimal approach would be the use of combinations of cannabinoids that had activity on CB1 and CB2 receptors, such as THC, and also incorporated other compounds with complementary activity, such as CBD. However, despite the promising preclinical results achieved to date, there are still a number of outstanding challenges that require intensive research in the future to bring this therapeutic alternative closer to the patient with guarantees. First, it will be essential to know in more detail the mechanisms of action of these cannabinoid compounds in animal models of Alzheimer’s to try to optimize future therapies. Secondly, progress needs to be made in clinical research with patients, which will undoubtedly be the greatest challenge. This will require the design of controlled clinical trials assessing the efficacy but also the safety of cannabinoids in a sufficient number of patients to allow statistically significant conclusions to be drawn. It would be desirable to consider first of all patients in the early stages of this disease in order to increase the chances of success. All of this requires the commitment, effort and coordination of all the actors involved: researchers, health personnel, patients, cannabinoid producers and funding agencies. The task is arduous, but highly motivating.

References

[1] Alzheimer’s Association. 2017 Alzheimer’s Disease. Facts and Figures. Alzheimer’s & Dementia, 2017 13:325-73.

[2] Howard R, McShane R, Lindesay J, et al. Donepezil and memantine for moderate-to-severe Alzheimer’s disease. N Engl J Med. 2012 366:893-903.

[3] Bloom GS. Amyloid-β and tau: the trigger and bullet in Alzheimer disease pathogenesis. JAMA Neurol. 2014 71:505-8

[4] Aso E, Ferrer I. Cannabinoids for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease: moving toward the clinic. Front Pharmacol. 2014 5:37

[5] Aymerich MS, Aso E, Abellanas MA, Tolon RM, Ramos JA, Ferrer I, Romero J, Fernández-Ruiz J. Cannabinoid pharmacology/therapeutics in chronic degenerative disorders affecting the central nervous system. Biochem Pharmacol. 2018 157:67-84.

[6] Benito C, Núñez E, Tolón RM, Carrier EJ, Rábano A, Hillard CJ, Romero J. Cannabinoid CB2 receptors and fatty acid amide hydrolase are selectively overexpressed in neuritic plaque-associated glia in Alzheimer’s disease brains. J Neurosci. 2003 23:11136-41.

[7] Aso E, Ferrer I. CB2 Cannabinoid receptor as potential target against Alzheimer’s disease. Front Neurosci. 2016 10:243.

[8] Manuel I, González de San Román E, Giralt MT, Ferrer I, Rodríguez-Puertas R. Type-1 cannabinoid receptor activity during Alzheimer’s disease progression. J Alzheimers Dis. 2014 42:761-6.

[9] Mulder J, Zilberter M, Pasquaré SJ, Alpár A, Schulte G, Ferreira SG, Köfalvi A, Martín-Moreno AM, Keimpema E, Tanila H, Watanabe M, Mackie K, Hortobágyi T, de Ceballos ML, Harkany T. Molecular reorganization of endocannabinoid signalling in Alzheimer’s disease. Brain. 2011 134:1041-60.

[10] Aso E, Andrés-Benito P, Ferrer I. Genetic deletion of CB(1) cannabinoid receptors exacerbates the Alzheimer-like symptoms in a transgenic animal model. Biochem Pharmacol. 2018 157:210-216.

[11] Krishnan S, Cairns R, Howard R. Cannabinoids for the treatment of dementia. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009 2:CD007204.

[12] Aso E, Sánchez-Pla A, Vegas-Lozano E, Maldonado R, Ferrer I. Cannabis-based medicine reduces multiple pathological processes in AβPP/PS1 mice. J Alzheimers Dis. 2015 43:977-91.

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Over the past 15 years, scientific evidence has been accumulating, most of it obtained from experimental models, which support the hypothesis that certain cannabinoids may be beneficial for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. This paper summarises this evidence and sets out the challenges ahead and future prospects in this promising field of research. Alzheimer's disease

Cannabis, CBD oil and dementia

Currently there is no evidence to show that cannabis or cannabis oil (CBD oil) can stop, reverse or prevent dementia.

Can cannabis or CBD oil treat dementia or its symptoms?

There are no research studies that prove cannabis, or products such as cannabis oil (CBD oil), can stop, slow, reverse or prevent the diseases that cause dementia.

Some studies suggest cannabis could help to manage a few behavioural symptoms of dementia, such as agitation and aggression.

But more research is needed to understand the long-term effects of taking cannabis, and whether it is an effective and safe way to tackle dementia symptoms.

If you have any questions or concerns about cannabis use and the risk of dementia or other brain disorders, please talk to your GP.

Read our advice to help reduce your risk of developing dementia.

What is cannabis?

Coconut oil and dementia

Cannabis, also known as marijuana, is a plant. The dried leaves, flowering parts or resin extracted from the plant is taken recreationally.

Cannabis is made up for two main components – Tetrahydrocannabinol and Cannabidiol.

What is Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)?

THC is the main component of cannabis that invokes feelings of sociability, happiness or relaxation.

Products containing more than 0.2% THC are not legally available in the UK.

What is Cannabidiol (CBD)?

Cannabidiol or CBD does not cause any psychoactive or intoxicating effects.

Products that contain CBD are legal and can be bought on the high street or online.

Is there any evidence behind the cannabis and CBD oil claims?

There have been no clinical trials on the effects of cannabis or CBD oil in people living with dementia.

In the lab

A key hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease is the build up of clumps of a protein, called amyloid, in the brain. Some studies have shown that components of cannabis, including THC, appear to remove this protein from nerve cells grown in the lab.

Another study that gave both THC and CBD oil to mice with symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease showed an improved in learning and had less evidence of amyloid clumps in their bodies.

Research continues to better understand the effects of CBD oil on the brain. Some early evidence suggests that CBD oil may reduce inflammation in the brain, although this has yet to be proven in people.

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Dementia researchers Jason and Harri from UCL

Tackling the symptoms of dementia

Research does suggest that high concentrations of CBD oil could be useful for managing some of the symptoms of dementia such as agitation and anxiety.

A few small clinical trials have assessed the effects of cannabinoids (including THC and synthetic cannabinoids, such as nabilone) on behavioural symptoms of dementia. However, trials and studies so far have generally been small or low quality making it difficult to come to a conclusion.

It is also important to note that the researchers in these studies have used high concentrations of CBD oil that may not be available to buy. These studies have also been short term so we still don’t know what the long term effects of using CBD oil might be.

A study is currently underway at King’s College London that will look at whether a mouth spray containing cannabinoids could be used to reduce symptoms of agitation and aggression in a small group of people with Alzheimer’s disease.

Treating and preventing dementia

The jury is still out on whether cannabis or its by-products could be used to treat dementia. A lack of strong research studies mean that dubious and anecdotal reports have taken the place of hard evidence.

No studies or trials have looked into the effects of cannabis or its components on the underlying causes of Alzheimer’s disease in people.

Whilst the studies in the laboratory show some promise, we need to understand the wider effects that these components have before we can know whether they have any effect – positive or negative – on the development of Alzheimer’s in people.

There is some evidence that heavy, long-term use of cannabis could have a negative effect on our memory and thinking. Much more research needs to be done to tease apart any potential benefits and drawbacks.

It is also worth noting that many of these studies have involved a particular component of cannabis in isolation. Even if one component is found to influence dementia risk, it doesn’t necessarily mean that taking cannabis would have the same effect.

There is also a large amount of variation in the levels of THC and CBD oil in different strains of the plant so the effects could depend on the type of cannabis used.

Has Alzheimer’s Society ever funded research into cannabis and dementia?

Alzheimer’s Society has never funded research into cannabis and dementia risk, or into cannabis as a potential treatment for dementia symptoms.

This is because we have not received any high-quality applications from researchers intending to investigate these issues.

If we received a high-quality application into cannabis and dementia from a researcher based at a UK university, research institute or NHS trust, then we would certainly consider this for funding.

Currently there is no evidence to show that cannabis or cannabis oil (CBD oil) can stop, reverse or prevent dementia.